What I'm reading: Lisa Dawson & Tom Manley

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Articles - April 2014
Thursday, March 27, 2014

0414 reading lisa-dawsonLisa Dawson
Executive Director, Northeast Oregon Economic Development District

“I love to read! I usually have at least three books going at any given time. The nonfiction I read is often related to business and economics, church and religion, or organizational development. I love how books can take you to different places and times, give you a glimpse of other cultures, and provide information and ideas that can spark your imagination.”

0414 reading local-dollars-local-sense  Local Dollars, Local Sense: How to Shift Your Money from Wall Street to Main Street and Achieve Real Prosperity 
By Michael Shuman 

“NEOEDD and regional partners are involved in a community capital collaborative with the goal of connecting local businesses that need financing with individuals who are motivated to help create a thriving local economy, while also receiving a decent return on investment. The title of this book says it all — it provides reasons and methods to localize money to improve local economies.”
 0414 reading 91zedyo3pyl  

Bamboo and Blood 
By James Church 

“I’ve been reading a lot of Asian-influenced novels recently, and this one provided an intriguing look into North Korea. The protagonist is a principled North Korean policeman who travels the globe to solve a murder mystery. Part of the context of the novel was a country experiencing a devastating famine in the middle of a frigid winter. It was a fascinating peek into another culture.”

 


0414 reading tommanley1Tom Manley
President, Pacific Northwest College of Art

“Nonlinear and assorted might best describe my reading routine. By my bedside, there’s a bookcase with at least 10 things in different stages of completion, and at my office there are stacks of books, journals and reading folders I’m working through. Every day I try to read something about education, art or design, and at least one new poem.”

 0414 reading 71f3monjs l

VÍA LÁCTEA: A Woman of a Certain Age Walks the Camino 
By Ellen Waterston 

“Drawn from her walking journey along the Camino de Santiago, the network of ancient pilgrim routes that converge in Northwestern Spain at the tomb of St. James, Waterston’s poems are lively, varied in form, at times intimate, tough, tender and funny. Along with Ron Schultz’s illustrations, the short collection easily conjures the peregrino’s experience. The paperback version is what I’ve been toting around, but the real treasure is an exquisitely illustrated, letterpress edition that I have in my office. Printed by Atelier 6000 in Bend, it includes 14 of Ron Schultz’s evocative handmade prints.”

 
 0414 reading 978-0-8223-3917-5-frontcover  

Meeting the Universe Halfway: Quantum Physics and the Entanglement of Matter and Meaning
By Karen Barad

“Karen Barad, a particle physicist, [brings] our way of being in the universe in line with the science of how the universe actually works. This is more than a light-reading experience, and yet one finds resonance and applicability to the most basic questions and problems we face. Barad’s treatment covers wonderful stretches of intellectual ground, from debates between Niels Bohr and Werner Heisenberg and later Albert Einstein, to jute factories in India, the impact of biomimicry and nanotechnology — and even a wonderful Alice Fulton poem, from which the book takes its title.” 

 

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