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Downtime with Ron Green

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Articles - March 2014
Tuesday, February 25, 2014

DSC02717BY JESSICA RIDGWAY

Ron Green became president and CEO of Oregon Pacific Bank in August 2013. Before his promotion, Green, 46, served as the executive vice president and chief credit officer of the 35-year-old bank. Oregon Pacific Bank has full-service branches in Florence, Roseburg and Coos Bay, and a Trust and Loan Production office in Medford. Green resides in Florence, where the bank is headquartered, with his “best friend and love of my life,” his wife, Catherine. The couple have a 28-year-old son, Brandon, who lives in Idaho.

Downtime 0314 trumpetMusic Lover
"I studied trumpet privately until the age of 19 and began playing professionally around the Portland area. I played in various jazz, rock and soul bands from 1985 through 2004, and was hired as a side musician for several regional and national performers. I recall my beginning band teacher telling me I should play clarinet instead of the trumpet because of my slight overbite. I thought, ‘I’ll show you,’ and chose the trumpet in spite of his advice.”

Downtime 0314 bossUnlikely Boss
“The [Oregon Pacific Bank] board of directors alerted me that they planned on making a change in the position of president and CEO. I was shocked they asked, because I never thought I fit the mold, or stereotype, of a bank president. Bank presidents were supposed to be stodgy, ultra-conservative and unapproachable, right? I’ve always felt just the opposite. I enjoy leadership positions but have never wanted to be viewed or treated any differently because of my position.”

Downtime 0314 brocolliHealth Nut
“I enjoy spending time outdoors, like taking long walks on the beach. I also do [the workout] P90X [but] my routine has been slightly interrupted because of my change at the bank. I still try and be fit, but daily is a bit of an exaggeration at this point. I do eat very healthy. I try to avoid any fried foods and sugars. Catherine says my idea of the perfect dinner is boring: broiled fish or chicken, brown rice and steamed broccoli!”

Downtime 0314 funnyModest Soul
“It’s human nature, but I am my worst critic. I truly don’t admire myself and am always looking to improve [my] relationships at home and work, as well as the quality of my work. I’m someone who is motivated by the happiness and success of others. I believe my staff sees me as honest and genuine. I see myself as respectful and generally accommodating to others, but first and foremost — and my wife might disagree — I’m funny.”

Downtime 0314 fishModel Husband
“The last trip I took was a road trip with my wife. We drove from Florence to the Grand Teton National Park, to Yellowstone, to Mount Rushmore, Glacier National Park and back to Florence. The best day was when Catherine dropped me off about three miles downstream on the Firehole River. I fished for several hours with no luck, turned the corner and could see [Catherine] upstream. In that last stretch, I probably caught 20 fish, all while seeing Catherine looking so beautiful in the sunlight.”

 

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