Oregon agriculture - not just a commodity

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Articles - November/December 2013
Monday, October 28, 2013

BY BRANDON SAWYER

Maybe it’s because agriculture happens mostly outside the urban environment where most Oregonians live. Maybe it’s because farming seems an antiquated occupation and its present-day workforce is overlooked. Maybe it’s the 21st-century focus on organic and value-added crops, community-supported agriculture and backyard vegetable gardens. Whatever the reason, somehow most of us have forgotten about the huge role played by agricultural commodities in Oregon’s economy.

We’re talking single-syllable mainstays like wheat, hay, pork and pears. The consumer and industry focus on certification, heirlooms and buying local has certainly elevated agriculture, but such (trendy) products are dwarfed by the economic force of the state’s major commodities that are grown large-scale and feed a sophisticated export infrastructure, sending fresh and raw products overseas as well as supplying the region’s food processors, stores and restaurants.

Agricultural production alone was estimated at a record high $5.4 billion value by the Oregon Department of Agriculture (ODA) in 2012, topping 2011 by 2%. But ag’s “economic footprint” as estimated by Oregon State University’s Extension Service – production, processing, support services, food and drinking establishments, wholesale and retail trade, transportation and warehousing – generated direct and indirect sales of $49.1 billion in 2009. That’s 17% of statewide economic output, supporting 422,891 or 19% of total jobs. That’s a huge footprint, yet so low profile and geographically vast that it’s easy to miss.

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Comments   

 
Guest
0 #1 Great article!Guest 2014-10-06 12:16:52
We all agreed to the fact that agriculture contribute a lot of help to us and to our society and on how it end a certain issue of hunger and other common problems. What i found out to this article really impressed me. Thanks to the author for sharing this article about Oregon agriculture. The statistic impressed me as well.

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Guest
0 #2 Nifty Future Tips, Intraday Stock Tips, Intraday Tips Provided by CapitalHeightGuest 2014-12-11 08:28:03
tThis article really impressed me.We’re talking single-syllable mainstays like wheat, hay, pork and pears.Thanks to this author for providing this article about Oregon agriculture.

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