100 Best Nonprofits to Work For in Oregon 2013

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Articles - October 2013
Thursday, October 10, 2013

5,000 workers define the most rewarding nonprofit workplaces

RESEARCH BY BRANDON SAWYER

1013 NonprofitFor the fifth year, we showcase exemplary nonprofit workplaces with our 100 Best Nonprofits to Work For in Oregon project. More than 5,000 employees and volunteers from 159 nonprofits statewide took part in our 2013 survey.

The project is based on Oregon Business’ 20-year-old, well-known 100 Best Companies project. The nonprofit project was created to recognize nonprofits as key businesses critical to the economic health of the state, employing hundreds of thousands of Oregonians.

There was no cost to enter the survey, and any organization registered as a nonprofit, not-for-profit or government group was eligible to enter. Oregon Business research editor Brandon Sawyer, along with research partners DHM Research and the Nonprofit Association of Oregon, helped develop the survey and compile the results.
Here are the 2013 100 Best Nonprofits to Work For in Oregon as selected by the people who are most qualified to judge — the people who work there. We applaud your outstanding workplaces.

For details on the 100 Best Nonprofits project and methodology information, go to OregonBusiness.com/Oregon100best



 

Comments   

 
Guest
+1 #1 RE: 100 Best Nonprofits to Work For in Oregon 2013Guest 2013-10-20 22:53:09
I'm looking for the list of 100 best nonprofits to work for. I can't find the list and keep clicking on different links. Any thoughts? Thank you!
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Guest
+2 #2 You're in the right placeGuest 2013-10-21 02:08:29
Hello,
You're in the right article. It is displayed in 6 pages. If you click "Next," it will take you to the next page.

Alternatively, you could use the "article index." If you click "Top 34 Large Organizations," you will find that portion of the list. If you click, "Top 33 Medium Organizations," you will find that portion. And finally if you click "Top 33 Small Organizations," you will find the final portion of the list.

- Webmaster, OregonBusiness. com
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Guest
+1 #3 gggGuest 2013-10-25 14:42:08
You have to BUY the full list???? that is cheap.....won't come to your site anymore...and OBP should drop you too.
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Guest
+3 #4 WebmasterGuest 2013-10-25 14:53:01
That is incorrect, the Nonprofit list is available for free, above, in 6 pages. You can choose to purchase the list for download in spreadsheet format. Purchases of the list packages include additional information and help support the magazine's research.
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Guest
0 #5 Event planner volunteerGuest 2014-12-11 22:05:36
Hi, I am looking for a volunteer position in Event Planning. Can anybody tell me the best place to find.
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Guest
0 #6 ED NMSAGuest 2014-12-12 18:31:58
Quoting Guest:
Hi, I am looking for a volunteer position in Event Planning. Can anybody tell me the best place to find.

Planning some big and fun events for the Naturopathic Medical Student Association (NMSA). Great people, great experience- starting in January. Email if interested.
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