Home Back Issues January 2009 Film office wants a starring role

Film office wants a starring role

| Print |  Email
Archives - January 2009
Thursday, January 01, 2009


OregonFilm A film crew shooting the movie Burning Plain in Depoe Bay.

PORTLAND Oregon’s new head of the Governor’s Office of Film and Television wants more money to lure out-of-state productions.

Vince Porter, executive of the agency, plans to ask legislators this session to expand the Oregon Production Investment Fund, which is currently capped at $5 million. The annual fund is a pool of money that offers cash rebates to producers who spend at least $750,000 in the state.

Porter expected the fund to be tapped out as of mid-December, just six months into the agency’s fiscal year. When the fund dries up, so does his ability to secure productions in Oregon, he says. Already four cable companies wanting to shoot pilot programs in Oregon this year decided against doing buisiness here because of a lack of incentive money. “We have to say, ‘Can it wait until next year?’” he says.

Winning a production often comes down to which state offers the sweetest incentives, a game that has attracted some national criticism recently for being abused by producers and states at taxpayers’ expense.

An economic impact report commissioned by the office concluded out-of-state productions directly contributed $41 million to Oregon’s economy, and $22 million in wages for 669 jobs in 2007.

Asking for more money in this economy might be a tough sell, but Porter believes the economic benefits are on his side. “The efforts we put forth bring jobs to Oregon,” he says. “That’s not something every agency can say.”

Maybe if the state offers juicier incentives, a film like Mr. Brooks (2007), which in script takes place in Portland, would have been shot in Portland instead of Louisiana. Louisiana offers up to 35% in tax credit incentives.  

Oregon also is attractive because of its gloom and rain. The 2008 vampire flick Twilight was shot in St. Helens and Carver. “That’s an easy sell for us,” Porter says.

JASON SHUFFLER


Have an opinion? E-mail This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

 

More Articles

Spring thaw

News
Thursday, April 17, 2014
Spring ThawBY JASON NORRIS | OB BLOGGER

The “polar vortex” of 2014 seems to have finally thawed and we believe this change in weather will bring more sunshine to the U.S. economy as well.


Read more...

Eking out a living

News
Tuesday, April 08, 2014
04.08.14 thumb ourtable-coopfarmsBY HANNAH WALLACE | OB BLOGGER

It may be obvious, but most farmers don’t make a lot of money. According to preliminary data from the 2012 Agriculture Census, 52% of America’s 2.1 million principal farm-operators don’t call farming their primary occupation. Farm cooperatives may offer a solution.


Read more...

Workplace benefits

March 2014
Tuesday, February 25, 2014

Health care and vacations rule. That’s the consensus from our reader poll on workplace benefits that help retain and recruit employees.


Read more...

Closing the gap: Community colleges and workforce training

News
Thursday, March 27, 2014
03.27.14 thumb collegeBY MARY SPILDE | OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR

Community college career, technical and workforce programs present an opportunity to bring business and education together as never before.


Read more...

The 2014 List: The Top 33 Small Companies to Work, For in Oregon

March 2014
Thursday, February 27, 2014

100best14logoWebOur 100 Best Companies project turned 21 this year, so pop open the Champagne. Our latest survey gives us plenty to cheer.

 


Read more...

Wheel man

March 2014
Tuesday, February 25, 2014
BY LINDA BAKER

Les Schwab has put a premium on customer service since 1952, when legendary namesake Les Schwab founded the company with one store in Prineville. (Schwab died in 2007.) But if the corporate principles remain essentially the same, the world around this iconic Oregon business has changed dramatically.


Read more...

Small business sales go big

March 2014
Tuesday, February 25, 2014

BY BRANDON SAWYER

Sales of small businesses surged in 2013 according to the biggest Internet marketplace of such transactions, BizBuySell, increasing to 7,056 reported sales, a 24% increase over 2012, when they dropped 7%. Portland Metro sales tracked by the site grew 9% to 73, capping three years of solid growth. On top of that, Portland’s median sale price jumped 67% to $250K, versus just 13% to $180K nationally. Portland was one of just six metros tracked where the median sale price matched the median asking price, with sellers getting, on average, 92% of what they asked.

BTNMarch14 tableBTNMarch14 line


BTNMarch14 piePDXBTNMarch14 pieUSA


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS