West Coast port traffic by the numbers

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Articles - July/August 2013
Monday, July 08, 2013

BY BRANDON SAWYER

The Port of Portland just can’t catch a break. If it’s not a dispute between unions or a grain-terminal lockout, then it’s an ugly kernel of genetically modified wheat prompting countries to halt all exports. In 2012 Portland was the 11th largest container port on the West Coast and one of only three, with Seattle, where traffic fell. And year-to-date through April, every unit and tonnage is down double digits — containers, grain, autos, break bulk — except one. Mineral bulk grew 20%.

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