Home Back Issues May 2013 The STEM shortage

The STEM shortage

| Print |  Email
Articles - May 2013
Monday, April 29, 2013
Article Index
The STEM shortage
Page 2
Page 3
Page 4

0513 Skills 04Some of the largest shifts in education aimed at better preparing the future workforce are taking place not at the district or industry level, but all the way up at the state level. In 2011 Gov. Kitzhaber, with the support of educators, businesspeople and lawmakers, passed a series of educational reforms, including the 40-40-20 goal, which aims by 2025 to have 40% of Oregonians attaining a bachelor’s degree or higher,
40% earning a two-year degree or technical certificate and 20% earning at minimum a high school diploma or equivalent.

“We believe that goal broadly reflects the type of workforce that will be required in 2025, and that will help drive the state economy by then,” says Ben Cannon, a former teacher who now serves as Kitzhaber’s education policy advisor.

At present, Cannon says about 29% of Oregonians reach the first 40% goal and earn a four-year degree; only about 19% attain the middle 40%, which often comprises two-year degrees or technical certificates in STEM-related fields.

“That’s where we have to do the most work,” says Ryan Deckert, president of the Oregon Business Association, which worked closely with lawmakers on implementing the recent reforms.

Achieving 40-40-20, Cannon says, will at first take two major pushes: one to seamlessly connect all points along the pre-K through 20 learning continuum, and another having the state play a more active role in strategically investing education dollars. “We should be a more active investor,” he says, noting that the co-chairs’ proposed general fund education budget for the 2013-15 biennium was just under $8.5 billion. In Kitzhaber’s version of that budget, the state would invest in several specific outcomes — reading by third grade, for example — and at least $14 million to help improve students’ career readiness, particularly in STEM programs.

Similarly, Oregon Labor Commissioner Brad Avakian has requested $20 million to improve or help start new vocational education programs at up to 70 schools around the state. “Investment in STEM is designed to respond to very specific workforce needs, so we are moving in that direction,” Cannon says.

That movement ultimately aims to help grow the greater economy — and to address anxieties about Oregon, and American, competitiveness in an era characterized by waning education funding, the loss of traditional manufacturing jobs and the expansion of tech-oriented economies in China and India. To that end, the growing obsession with STEM education is part of a larger cultural narrative about the nation’s decline and possibilities for rebirth.

An increased focus on STEM and CTE programs won’t solve all the state’s economic challenges. But it will help students of all learning styles and interests find meaningful career pathways, while ensuring major Oregon employers such as Leatherman, Digimarc and PCC Structurals will be able to find the skilled workers they need right here. And although many claim the current reforms and level of investment don’t go far enough, the big-picture goals of more rigorous education — STEM and otherwise — enjoy widespread support.

“As the governor has put it, you can go in a circle of prosperity or you can circle down the drain,” Deckert says. “The way we’re heading with education, we’re hoping to keep everyone on the prosperity initiative.”

0513 Skills Facts

Jon Bell is a Portland-based freelance writer and a regular contributor to Oregon Business. He can be reached at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .



 

Comments   

 
Guest
+1 #1 Just in Oregon problem?Guest 2013-04-29 18:29:28
Maybe this issue is just Oregon specific. The Atlantic has an article today that come to the exact opposite conclusion: America’s tech talent shortage is a myth
http://qz.com/79322/americas-tech-talent-shortage-is-a-myth/
And the Economic Policy Institute also reports there's no dearth of STEM talent.
http://www.epi.org/files/2013/bp359-guestworkers-high-skill-labor-market-analysis.pdf
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
Guest
-1 #2 writerGuest 2013-05-03 18:11:15
Thanks for your comments. One of the issues behind the STEM worker and skills gap issue is whether or not there is indeed a shortage or a gap. For every study that says there isn't a shortage or gap (e.g. the links you shared), there are others that point in the other direction (those cited in the story). The bigger focus for this piece was more about the skilled trades and associated jobs — many of which have become more advanced over the years and now require some STEM training — and how the education system in Oregon is evolving (or not) to produce the full range of workers that companies here in Oregon will need in the future.
Quote | Report to administrator
 

More Articles

Spring thaw

News
Thursday, April 17, 2014
Spring ThawBY JASON NORRIS | OB BLOGGER

The “polar vortex” of 2014 seems to have finally thawed and we believe this change in weather will bring more sunshine to the U.S. economy as well.


Read more...

Video: Kickstarting Oregon business

News
Thursday, March 27, 2014
02.04.14 Thumbnail VideoBY JESSICA RIDGWAY | OB WEB EDITOR

Watch this OB Original Video about three Oregon companies and how crowd-funding "kickstarted" their business ideas.


Read more...

Green eyeshades in the ivory tower

News
Friday, April 04, 2014
EducationCosts BlogBY ERIC FRUITS

The rapidly rising cost of higher education has left even the smartest researchers and the wonkiest of wonks wondering what’s happening and where’s all that money going. More and more, prospective students—and their families—are asking: Is college worth the cost?


Read more...

The 2014 100 Best Companies to Work for in Oregon

News
Friday, February 28, 2014

100best14logo ThumbnailThe 21st annual 100 Best Companies to Work For in Oregon list was announced Thursday night at an awards dinner at the Oregon Convention Center.


Read more...

The solution to youth unemployment

News
Thursday, February 27, 2014
02.27.14 Thumbnail TeenworkBY ERIC FRUITS

Because they have little chance of working for someone else, today’s teens need to be entrepreneurs. But, first, we must teach our teens that entrepreneurship starts small.


Read more...

Leader's bookshelf

Contributed Blogs
Friday, March 14, 2014
02.06.14 BooksBY TOM COX | OB BLOGGER

Five books that will make you a better leader.


Read more...

Tech makes the world go round

Contributed Blogs
Thursday, March 20, 2014
03.20.14 thumb internetBY JASON NORRIS | GUEST BLOGGER

I don’t think anyone can (or should) remember what it was like to get things done without the internet. This milestone in technology has certainly benefited brick-and-mortar companies and subsequently launched a new era of businesses.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS