April 2013

OSU scientists create new purple tomato

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Articles - April 2013
Monday, April 01, 2013

0413 NextTomatoes owe their red color to carotenoids, a group of fat-soluble pigments rich in antioxidants. Now scientists at Oregon State University have created a new, purple tomato — “Indigo Rose” — that owes its eggplant color to another class of nutrient-heavy pigments called “anthocyanins.”

 

Powerlist: banks

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Articles - April 2013
Monday, April 01, 2013

This month's Powerlist ranks banks by 6/30/12 Oregon and Clark County, Washington deposits.

 

Foreclosure: myths and reality

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Articles - April 2013
Monday, April 01, 2013

0413 BOB FinanceOver the years since the mortgage bubble burst, the term “bank” has been a four-letter word and an easy target for the media, the legislature and the general public. In fact, my own peers at community banks and credit unions have been known to jump on the bandwagon through the sound bite of “Main Street vs. Wall Street.”

 

Exports drive job growth

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Articles - April 2013
Monday, April 01, 2013

0413 BOB BizMattersThe link is simple, straightforward and well proven: finding export markets for Oregon products means thousands of jobs for Oregonians here at home.

 

Beyond gridlock: renewing development in the Convention Center, Rose Quarter and Lloyd districts

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Articles - April 2013
Monday, April 01, 2013

0413 BOB PortlandDevelopmentThe Oregon Convention Center Phase 1 opened in 1990, and Phase 2 opened in 2003. The Rose Garden opened in 1995, and the last constructed high-rise office building in the Lloyd District opened in 1997. We are now in 2013, and nothing of significance has been built in the three districts for more than 10 years.

 

What I'm reading: Sam Blackman

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Articles - April 2013
Monday, April 01, 2013

0413 BOB WhatImReading Blackman 01Sam Blackman, CEO of Elemental Technologies, shares what he's reading.

 

What I'm reading: Linda Navarro

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Articles - April 2013
Monday, April 01, 2013

0413 BOB WhatImReading Navarro 02Linda Navarro, President and CEO of Oregon Bankers Association, shares what she's reading.

 
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Editor's Letter: Power Play

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Thursday, December 11, 2014

There’s a fascinating article in the December issue of the Harvard Business Review about a profound power shift taking place in business and society. It’s a long read, but the gist revolves around the tension between “old power” and “new power” as a driver of transformation. Here’s an excerpt:

Old power works like a currency. It is held by few. Once gained, it is jealously guarded, and the powerful have a substantial store of it to spend. It is closed, inaccessible, and leader-driven. It downloads, and it captures.

New power operates differently, like a current. It is made by many. It is open, participatory, and peer-driven. It uploads, and it distributes. Like water or electricity, it’s most forceful when it surges. The goal with new power is not to hoard it but to channel it.

The authors, Henry Timms and Jeremy Heimans, don’t necessarily favor one form of power over another but merely outline how power is transitioning, and how companies can take advantage of these changes to strengthen their positions in the marketplace. 

Our Powerbook issue might be viewed as a case study in the new-power transition. This annual book of lists provides information on leading businesses, nonprofits and universities in the state. Most of the featured companies are entrenched power players now pursuing more flexible and less hierarchical approaches to doing business. Law firms, for example, are adopting new technologies and fee structures to make legal services more accessible and affordable.

This month we also take a look at a controversial new U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission rule requiring public companies to disclose the median pay of workers, as well as the ratio between CEO and median-worker pay. 

Part of the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial reform law, the rule will compel public companies to be more open about employee compensation, with the assumption that greater transparency will improve corporate performance and, perhaps, help address one of the major challenges of our time: income inequality.

New power is not only about strategy and tactics, the Harvard Business Review authors say. “The ultimate questions are ethical. The big question is whether new power can genuinely serve the common good and confront society’s most intractable problems.”

That sounds like a call to arms. Or a New Year’s resolution. Old power or new, the goals are the same: to be a force for positive change in the world. Happy 2015!

— Linda


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Downtime

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Political Clout

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Businesses spend billions of dollars each year trying to influence political decision makers by piling money into campaigns.


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