GlobeSherpa's smart transit

| Print |  Email
Articles - April 2013
Monday, April 01, 2013

 

BY LINDA BAKER

0413 FOB Launch Globesherpa
Nat Parker, CEO of GlobeSherpa
// Photo by Sierra Breshears

In many parts of Europe and Asia, mobile tickets and payments for transit are ubiquitous. Not so in the United States, where only two public transit agencies use mobile ticketing systems: MBTA Commuter Rail in Boston and New York Waterway. Now Nat Parker, chief executive of GlobeSherpa, a Portland-based mobile ticketing startup, aims to spread the smart payment gospel. The company has developed a platform that allows riders to buy tickets on their smartphones. The system also lets fare inspectors check for and validate tickets and gives transit agencies access to real-time sales and purchasing data. Another plus: Consumers can buy the e-tickets as a group, a useful feature for everyone from families to fans attending Blazer games. After launching in 2010, GlobeSherpa is now beta testing the platform on TriMet buses and expects to debut the system citywide on buses, MAX and commuter trains in June. A next step is to integrate the platform with local merchants. Consumers can also use the software to purchase parking spaces, Parker says. GlobeSherpa is in conversation with other transit agencies nationwide, and Parker says many U.S. cities are eager to catch up with the rest of the world, at least in the smartticketing arena. “Wherever you can reduce cash, you stand to create a very big efficiency and save money. We’re bullish on mobile payments.”

COMPANY: GlobeSherpa

PRODUCT: Mobile ticketing services

CEO: Nat Parker

HEADQUARTERS: Portland

LAUNCHED: 2010

TRUTH TELLER: “Security is the No. 1 issue in designing mobile payment software; it’s got to be rock solid and secure. The user experience is No. 2. It has to be easy to use and fun. Anyone using a TriMet ticket today has pretty much the exact opposite experience.”

BACK OFFICE: Raised $500,000 in seed round led by TIE, Portland Seed Fund and Alliance of Angels. Landed $1.3 million in Series B Funding. Employs nine people, mostly software engineers, with plans to hire a director of business development and sales associates.

 

More Articles

An uncertain future

Guest Blog
Thursday, May 21, 2015
norristhumbBY JASON NORRIS | GUEST BLOGGER

Uncertainty is a part of doing business, whether in through the lens of investment opportunities and risks or the business of running an enterprise.


Read more...

Photo Log: The 2015 100 Best Green Workplaces in Oregon

The Latest
Wednesday, May 27, 2015
greenthumbPHOTOS BY JASON E. KAPLAN

Oregon Business celebrated the 100 Best Green Workplaces with an awards luncheon yesterday at the Nines Hotel in downtown Portland.


Read more...

No Boundaries

June 2015
Friday, May 22, 2015
BY AMY MILSHTEIN

Floor plans embrace the great wide open.


Read more...

Marijuana law ushers in new business age

The Latest
Tuesday, June 23, 2015
062315panelthumbBY KIM MOORE | RESEARCH EDITOR

Oregon’s new marijuana law is expected to lead to a bevy of new business opportunities for the state. And not just for growers. Law firms, HR consultants, energy efficiency companies and many others are expected to benefit from the decriminalization of pot, according to panelists at an Oregon Business breakfast meeting on Tuesday.


Read more...

Sun set

June 2015
Friday, May 22, 2015
BY CHRIS NOBLE

The right sunglasses can protect your eyes and look cool at the same time. This being the 21st century, select shades are socially conscious, too. Portland brand Shwood uses wood and other natural materials and manufactures locally. Founded by Ann Sacks, the brand Fetch dedicates a portion of its profits to animal welfare. But whether you choose classic tortiseshell or aviator chic, please, shed the sunglasses when you walk in the door — and, of course, at night. 


Read more...

Credit Unions Perspective

June 2015
Tuesday, May 26, 2015
BY KIM MOORE

A conversation with Gene Pelham, CEO of Rogue Credit Union.


Read more...

Cherry Raincoat

June 2015
Tuesday, May 26, 2015
BY LINDA BAKER

Spring rains are the bane of an Oregon cherry farmer’s existence. Even a few sprinkles can crack the fruit so badly it’s not worth picking. Science to the rescue: Researchers at Oregon State University have developed a spray-on film that cuts rain-related cracking in half, potentially saving a season’s crop. The coating, patented as SureSeal, is made from natural chemicals similar to those found in the skins of cherries: cellulose, palm oil-based wax and calcium.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS