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The game changers

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Articles - April 2013
Monday, April 01, 2013
Natalie Ramsland

Owner, Sweetpea Bicycles

0413 GameChangers 11
// Photo by Joseph Eastburn

For years, the rules of custom bike building were written with certain cyclists in mind: European male racers.

But when Natalie Ramsland first set out to build her own bikes in 2005, she realized the rules were meant to be broken. The 36-year-old California native saw a need for women looking for bikes that truly fit them and allowed them to get more out of a bike than they ever thought possible. Which is why Ramsland learned everything she could about proper fitting and building and launched Sweetpea Bicycles in Portland in 2005.

“What makes my bikes so unique is the way they fit individuals,” says Ramsland, who studied architectural design and worked as a bike messenger before shifting to bike building.

Eight years later, Ramsland has long since perfected her approach to building bicycles for women, which starts with a three-hour fitting session for custom bikes and tends to every detail, from frame angles to colors and accessories. The cost of one of her custom builds — she produces between 12 and 18 each year — runs between $3,600 and $4,000; the wait list is three years.

Sweetpea has built up such a following, though, that many who want one can’t wait three years. So Ramsland introduced the Lust line, which offers three frame sizes, produced by fabricators in Eugene, that she custom fits to individual riders. Those are ready in about 12 weeks. “Still, everything I do is at the very individual level,” Ramsland says, “and it works beautifully.”

SIDELINES

"For a lot of people, there's a relationship between the person and their bike. It's a love that runs deep. There's an emotional connection."



 

Comments   

 
Guest
+1 #1 The Key QuestionGuest 2013-04-02 18:16:27
They should have asked Dr. Chestnutt if he would let his boys play football. In fact I think we should take a poll of neuroscientists and perhaps medical doctors with that simple question: Would you let your boys play football? I would not and have written as much in the past:

http://knowyourbrain.org/mamas.htm
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Guest
+1 #2 writerGuest 2013-04-02 20:36:10
Thanks for the comment. While it didn't make it into the story, we did ask Dr. Chestnutt that question. He does have a son who plays football and who in fact has had — and recovered from — a concussion himself.
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