The game changers

| Print |  Email
Articles - April 2013
Monday, April 01, 2013

Jason Stollenwerk

Managing Director, Entre Prises

0413 GameChangers 09
// Photo by Joseph Eastburn

Thanks to Smith Rock State Park, Central Oregon has long been known as an outdoor climbing mecca. Thanks to Entre Prises USA, the area has also become renowned for indoor climbing.

The company, which started in France in 1983 and expanded to Bend in 1988, specializes in custom climbing walls. Its modular holds were among the first commercially marketed climbing holds anywhere. Today, its walls, made of everything from plywood to innovative complex composites, are among the most sought-after in the U.S. — and possibly the world.

“Both in volume and in reputation, we are probably the biggest globally, and in the U.S. we definitely are,” says Jason Stollenwerk, managing director for Entre Prises in Bend, which employs 40 people.

In addition to the longevity that comes from being one of the first climbing wall manufacturers, Stollenwerk says the company’s innovative designs and surface materials — from angular wood walls to hand-formed, natural-looking rock faces — have kept it at the front edge of the industry.

To date, Entre Prises has manufactured and installed more than 4,000 projects. The Bend operation alone builds between 50 and 60 each year primarily for North America, ranging in price from $20,000 to more than $800,000. And while there are lots of walls going up in the U.S., Stollenwerk says indoor climbing here is still four or five years behind Europe.

“The U.S. has a good ways to go yet,” he says, “and that’s a good thing for us.”

SIDELINES

“I think we’re really able to push the design envelope, but we also really focus on the client’s return on investment. It’s great to have a beautiful wall, but it’s also got to be practical and profitable.”



 

Comments   

 
Guest
+1 #1 The Key QuestionGuest 2013-04-02 18:16:27
They should have asked Dr. Chestnutt if he would let his boys play football. In fact I think we should take a poll of neuroscientists and perhaps medical doctors with that simple question: Would you let your boys play football? I would not and have written as much in the past:

http://knowyourbrain.org/mamas.htm
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
Guest
+1 #2 writerGuest 2013-04-02 20:36:10
Thanks for the comment. While it didn't make it into the story, we did ask Dr. Chestnutt that question. He does have a son who plays football and who in fact has had — and recovered from — a concussion himself.
Quote | Report to administrator
 

More Articles

Photo Diary: Forest Grove Farmers Market

The Latest
Thursday, May 14, 2015
IMG 8469BY JASON E. KAPLAN | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

There are more than 160 farmers markets in Oregon, contributing an estimated $50 million in sales, according to the Oregon Farmers Markets Association. We checked in on the Forest Grove market, which for several years has brought local produce and food vendors to Main Street in the center of town.


Read more...

6 highlights from the Craft Brewers Conference

The Latest
Friday, April 17, 2015
thumbcbcPHOTOS BY  JASON E. KAPLAN

The 32nd annual CBC attracted a record number of attendees (11,000)  to the Oregon Convention Center.


Read more...

Foundations perspective

May 2015
Monday, April 27, 2015
BY KIM MOORE

A conversation with Martha Richards, executive director of the James F. & Marion L. Miller Foundation.


Read more...

Can small be large?

Linda Baker
Wednesday, April 01, 2015
040115-lindablogthumbBY LINDA BAKER

Leaders in Oregon's ag sector gathered this morning in Portland’s Coopers Hall winery/taproom to discuss the role of the region as an export gateway, impediments to exporting products and solutions to containerized shipping challenges.


Read more...

Knight Cancer Challenge No Biotech Dream

May 2015
Monday, April 27, 2015
BY JOE CORTRIGHT

The Knight challenge is an important instance of philanthropy. But we should not assume it will magically transform OHSU into a business- and job-spinning engine for the local economy.


Read more...

Picture This

May 2015
Monday, April 27, 2015
BY JACOB PALMER

As a general rule, the more people with autism can be provided with visual cues, the better they will be able to understand and manage their environment. It’s a lesson Tom Keating learned well. The 61-year-old Eugene grant writer spent 31 years taking care of his autistic brother James, and in the late 1980s developed a spreadsheet that created a series of nonsense characters that grew or shrank depending on how much money James had in his account. 


Read more...

Oregon Business expands events portfolio

The Latest
Friday, March 27, 2015
htctfacebookBY OB STAFF

New events series brings magazine to life.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS