The game changers

| Print |  Email
Articles - April 2013
Monday, April 01, 2013

Danielle Foxhoven

Soccer Player, Portland Thorns

0413 GameChangers 01
Under head coach Cindy Parlow Cone (right), Danielle Foxhoven and other members of the Portland Thorns will kick off a new era of women's professional soccer in Portland.
// Photo by Joseph Eastburn

Danielle Foxhoven was supposed to go to Philadelphia in 2012. She ended up in Russia instead. A graduate of the University of Portland, where she was one of the highest-scoring women’s soccer players in the school’s history, Foxhoven had been signed to play for the Women’s Professional Soccer league’s Philadelphia Independence. But the league folded a few weeks before the season began, so Foxhoven jumped at an opportunity to play in Russia for six months.

Back in Portland last fall, Foxhoven found another opportunity a little closer to home: the Portland Thorns, one of eight professional teams in the new National Women’s Soccer League. She signed in February.

“I think it will be amazing to have a professional women’s team in Portland,” says Foxhoven, 23. “I think the city really embodies the sport of soccer, and there’s such a great culture here already.” Also on the Thorns’ roster are Alex Morgan and fellow UP graduate Christine Sinclair, widely considered to be among the best women players in the world.

The team kicks off its inaugural season with an opener in Kansas City on April 13. The first home game will be at Jeld-Wen Field on April 21, and fans are already getting riled up. As of March 1, an estimated 5,000 season ticket holders were on board.

“Portland will have crazy fans, the best fans,” Foxhoven says, “and I really think they’ll be proud of this team.”

SIDELINES

"This team is stacked. We have players who are unarguably the best in the world. It is an honor and I am humbled to have the opportunity to play with them."



 

Comments   

 
Guest
+1 #1 The Key QuestionGuest 2013-04-02 18:16:27
They should have asked Dr. Chestnutt if he would let his boys play football. In fact I think we should take a poll of neuroscientists and perhaps medical doctors with that simple question: Would you let your boys play football? I would not and have written as much in the past:

http://knowyourbrain.org/mamas.htm
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
Guest
+1 #2 writerGuest 2013-04-02 20:36:10
Thanks for the comment. While it didn't make it into the story, we did ask Dr. Chestnutt that question. He does have a son who plays football and who in fact has had — and recovered from — a concussion himself.
Quote | Report to administrator
 

More Articles

Oregon businesses face destruction from future earthquake

The Latest
Wednesday, May 20, 2015
htctthumb1BY KIM MOORE | RESEARCH EDITOR

An earthquake would completely destroy many Oregon businesses, highlighting the urgent need for the private and public sectors to collaborate on shoring up disaster preparedness, said panelists at an Oregon Business breakfast summit today.


Read more...

The ancient fish that stops bullets

The Latest
Friday, May 08, 2015
hagfishthumbBY CHRIS NOBLE | PHOTOS BY JASON E. KAPLAN

Hagfish may not have evolved much over the last 300 million years, but their protein-heavy slime promises advances in super-materials.


Read more...

Sun set

June 2015
Friday, May 22, 2015
BY CHRIS NOBLE

The right sunglasses can protect your eyes and look cool at the same time. This being the 21st century, select shades are socially conscious, too. Portland brand Shwood uses wood and other natural materials and manufactures locally. Founded by Ann Sacks, the brand Fetch dedicates a portion of its profits to animal welfare. But whether you choose classic tortiseshell or aviator chic, please, shed the sunglasses when you walk in the door — and, of course, at night. 


Read more...

Cherry Raincoat

June 2015
Tuesday, May 26, 2015
BY LINDA BAKER

Spring rains are the bane of an Oregon cherry farmer’s existence. Even a few sprinkles can crack the fruit so badly it’s not worth picking. Science to the rescue: Researchers at Oregon State University have developed a spray-on film that cuts rain-related cracking in half, potentially saving a season’s crop. The coating, patented as SureSeal, is made from natural chemicals similar to those found in the skins of cherries: cellulose, palm oil-based wax and calcium.


Read more...

The Backstory: Portland Youth Builders

The Latest
Wednesday, June 03, 2015
blog002 1BY JASON E. KAPLAN | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

As part of our green workplaces story, Oregon Business checked out a community service project undertaken by Portland Youth Builders, a nonprofit alternative high school. In partnership with Whole Foods, PYB built garden boxes for a Home Forward  housing site. Home Forward is a government agency that provides housing for low income residents and people with disabilities.


Read more...

Undersea Power

June 2015
Friday, May 22, 2015
BY JACOB PALMER

Mike Morrow and Mike Delos-Reyes first came up with the idea of an ocean power device 23 years ago, when they were students at Oregon State University. They realized a long-held vision last summer, when their startup, M3 Wave, successfully launched the first ocean power device that works underwater.


Read more...

The Green Paradox

June 2015
Friday, May 22, 2015
BY EMILY LIEDEL

Inside the topsy-turvy world of corporate sustainability rankings.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS