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100 Best: In the family

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Articles - March 2013
Friday, March 01, 2013
0313 100BestFeature SleepCountry 01
Above: An employee-owned firm, Sleep Country USA supports and empowers everyone who works at the company. From left: Megan Leslie, Laura Akert and Omar Jaramillo.
Below: Free concert tickets and company bowling parties are among the employee perks at Sleep Country.
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0313 100BestFeature SleepCountry 03
“We were looking to find one cause where we could really make a difference,” says brand director Gina Davis of Sleep Country’s foster kids program.
// Photos by Eric Naslund

Sleepcountry USA

Location: statewide

Rank: 14th best large company

Years on the list: 1

Sure, employees for one of the Northwest’s most ubiquitous mattress companies — did you just sing the jingle in your head? — can get tickets to see anyone from Kiss to Kenny Chesney at the major concert venues sponsored by Sleep Country USA. But there’s much more to Sleep Country than rock and roll or country music that makes it a great place to work.

“We are an employee-owned company, so everyone is involved, enabled and really empowered to make the decisions that make us a great company,” says Gina Davis, director of branding for Sleep Country.

Among a long list of standard benefits for employees, Sleep Country hosts regular company gatherings, pays staff for two days’ worth of community service each year and offers extensive training for anyone looking to advance or improve.

“If we have employees who are struggling, you don’t get rid of them,” Davis says. “You help them. We give a lot of support to employees to help make them successful.” 

The company also prides itself on its Sleep Country Foster Kids program, a community service program aimed at supporting the more than 20,000 foster children who call the Northwest home. Davis says every employee gets involved in it somehow, whether it’s a driver delivering donated clothes or Christmas presents or a salesperson accepting donations in a store. 

“That has become a great program that really brings everyone together,” Davis says. 


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