Home Back Issues March 2013 100 Best: In the family

100 Best: In the family

| Print |  Email
Articles - March 2013
Friday, March 01, 2013
Article Index
100 Best: In the family
Urban Airship
Lone Rock Timber
Boly:Welch
Sleepcountry USA
Ninkasi Brewing
Barran Liebman
Pacific Benefit Consultants
Odyssey Hospice
0313 100BestFeature BolyWelch 01
Above: Melissa Day, Roxanne Rotticci and Karen Fogg drink coffee by the photo wall of employee faces.
Below: The unique culture at Boly:Welch includes flexibility — and canine friends. Employee Lauren Lofano with dog Winston.
0313 100BestFeature BolyWelch 02
0313 100BestFeature BolyWelch 04
Above: “We play together, we work together,” says Pat Welch of the team at Boly:Welch, which includes Julia Chan, Cory Mlady and Diane Boly.
Below: Boly:Welch employee Andrew Beeks enjoys a few office chocolates.
// Photos by Eric Naslund
0313 100BestFeature BolyWelch 05

Boly:Welch

Location: Portland

Rank: 2nd best small company

Years on the list: 9

When Pat Welch and Diane Boly started their recruiting and consulting firm in 1986, Welch was a busy single mother, so she knew from the start how important it was to have time for both family and work. 

Twenty-seven years later, that concept is still alive and well at Boly:Welch. Need to check out early for your son’s soccer game? Go ahead. Babysitter fall through for the day? No worries, bring the kids to work and let them hang out in the loft or take them downstairs for an ice cream on the company’s tab at Baskin-Robbins. 

“We want our people to do a great job, but not at the expense of their families,” Welch says. “It’s not altruistic, it’s just smart.” 

A pet-friendly company with a wide-open door policy — “because there are no doors,” Welch says — Boly:Welch operates less on structure and more on accomplishments. That means employees are given flexibility, including time for power naps or other nonstandard breaks, in getting their work done. 

“We want people to work when the energy is going,” Welch says. “We expect quality work and ethical work, but how you do it is your choice.” 

For that work, employees are rewarded with generous benefits, unique parties including one at Silcox Hut high up on Mount Hood and an employer who lets them be more than just employees. 

“I think the biggest thing,” Welch says, “is that people feel they really have the opportunity to be who they are.”



 

More Articles

College Conundrum

October 2014
Thursday, September 25, 2014
BY KIM MOORE

University and college tuition fees have been rising for more than a decade, while state funds for higher education have steadily declined.


Read more...

True Blood

October 2014
Thursday, September 25, 2014
BY JOE ROJAS-BURKE

Antibiotics really aren’t magic bullets.


Read more...

Back to School

September 2014
Wednesday, August 27, 2014
BY LEE VAN DER VOO

By now we’ve all read the headlines: Starbucks is giving away free degrees. Except it isn’t.


Read more...

Molecular Movies

September 2014
Wednesday, August 27, 2014
BY LINDA BAKER

Dr. Chong Fang isn’t God. But the assistant professor of chemistry at Oregon State University is getting closer to figuring out how he put everything together. 


Read more...

The 100 Best Nonprofits to Work for in Oregon 2014

October 2014
Thursday, September 25, 2014
14BY KIM MOORE

Proud, diverse and underpaid.

Pride in their organizations’ mission, fairness in the treatment of women and ethnic minorities, flexible work schedules — these are just a handful of workplace characteristics that employees of this year’s 100 Best Nonprofits appreciate about their organizations.


Read more...

Revenge Forestry

November/December 2014
Tuesday, October 14, 2014
BY JONATHAN FROCHTZWAJG

A flare-up in the Elliott Forest raises questions about détente in Oregon’s timber wars.


Read more...

A Recipe for Success

October 2014
Thursday, September 25, 2014
BY LINDA BAKER

Two businesswomen, two iconic food brands and one food-obsessed city. We thought this sounded like a recipe for good conversation. So in late August, Oregon Business sat down with Wendy Collie, CEO of New Seasons Market, and Kim Malek, owner of Salt & Straw, to discuss their rapidly expanding businesses and Oregon’s trendsetting food scene.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS