Home Back Issues March 2013 Rank and file: sick leave

Rank and file: sick leave

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Articles - March 2013
Monday, February 25, 2013

 

BY BRANDON SAWYER

0313 FOB RankAndFile SickLeavePortland may soon mandate that all businesses with more than six employees provide paid sick leave, joining Seattle, San Francisco and Washington D.C., as one of the few cities to offer the benefit. In 2012, Connecticut became the first state to require paid sick leave, but exempted companies with fewer than 50 workers. While opponents cite the burden placed on small businesses in a tough economy, proponents point to public health concerns and claim the laws boost productivity. In the midst of the debate, it’s clear that access to paid sick leave depends largely on the industry in question. The Bureau of Labor Statistics breaks down the cost of the benefit by region – as of September 2012, it accounted for just 0.9% of average worker compensation in the Pacific region, versus 1.0% in the Northeast, 0.8% in the South and 0.7% in the Midwest.

Access to paid sick leave
in the United States
2010 2011 2012
Private industry workers 62% 63% 61%
Utilities 93% 94% 93%
Information 89% 89% 90%
Financial activities 89% 89% 88%
Private educational services 75% 76% 79%
Real estate and rental/leasing 80% 79% 79%
Private health care and social assistance 78% 78% 76%
Transportation and warehousing 72% 71% 71%
Professional and business services 64% 65% 66%
Manufacturing 61% 62% 62%
Private service-providing industries 64% 64% 62%
Private goods-producing industries 54% 56% 56%
Retail trade 51% 52% 49%
Construction 36% 37% 40%
Accommodation and food services 29% 30% 24%
State and local government workers 89% 89% 89%
Public educational services 90% 90% 89%
Public health care and social assistance 91% 91% 87%
 

Comments   

 
Guest
0 #1 ownerGuest 2013-03-22 22:13:54
This will only burden small businesses more. Prices will keep going up to cover the costs and more people will be layed off cause of costs. Way to go Portland.
Quote | Report to administrator
 

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