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What I'm reading: Steve Smith

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Articles - March 2013
Monday, February 25, 2013

 

Steve Smith, CEO of Tec Laboratories, tells us what he's reading.

0313 BOB WhatImReading SteveSmith 01

Assassination That Changed America Forever by Bill O’Reilly, Martin Dugard

“O’Reilly does a masterful job of recreating the tension of the last days of the Civil War and the buildup to Lincoln’s assassination by threading together historic documents into a page-turning whodunit.”

0313 BOB WhatImReading SteveSmith 02

Great by Choice by Jim Collins

“Jim Collins’ latest looks into the ‘black box’ of running a successful company by looking at novel facets of successful and enduring companies. I especially liked his comparing the conquest of the South Pole and the discipline the successful explorer had with his consistent ‘20-mile march.’”

0313 BOB WhatImReading SteveSmith 03

The Happiness Advantage by Shawn Achor

“Achor’s book came to my attention from my 11-year-old daughter’s school principal, who showed the DVD to her teachers and parents to help create a positive environment in their K-8 school. Achor is on the leading edge of positive psychology and its application in the corporate world.”

0313 BOB WhatImReading SteveSmith 04

The Innovator’s DNA: Mastering the Five Skills of Disruptive Innovators by Dyer, Gregersen et al.

“Innovator’s DNA identifies the five characteristics of great innovators, such as Steve Jobs and the founders of Google and PayPal. I really like this book and have eight on my desk to be handed out to my R&D team.”

0313 BOB WhatImReading SteveSmith 05

FLOW: The Psychology of Optimal Experience by Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi

“An explanation of the neuroscience behind those moments when we lose track of time in something that interests and challenges us, known as ‘flow’ or ‘in the zone.’ The author helps identify those moments and what we can do to have more of them.”

 

 

 

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This month we also take a look at a controversial new U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission rule requiring public companies to disclose the median pay of workers, as well as the ratio between CEO and median-worker pay. 

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That sounds like a call to arms. Or a New Year’s resolution. Old power or new, the goals are the same: to be a force for positive change in the world. Happy 2015!

— Linda


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