Tillamook Cheese Factory's transition

| Print |  Email
Articles - February 2013
Monday, January 28, 2013

 

0213 Tillamook 06
Though TCCA cut nearly 50 positions last year, it still employs close to 600 people, and its Tillamook factory draws more than 1 million visitors per year.
// Photo by Sierra Breshears

Though cutting positions was a tough decision, Joe Rocha, a third-generation dairy farmer and chairman of the TCCA board, says it made the most sense from a business perspective. The creamery did what it could to assist those employees who had been impacted, he says, and since then it’s made capital investments in its facilities and even added some positions back, albeit not in packaging. At press time, Tillamook had 13 job openings posted on its website, all of them in Oregon.

“We seem to be through that,” Rocha says of the disharmony the layoffs may have caused.

Of Tillamook’s current trajectory for growth by expanding into new markets, Rocha says the board and the farmers are supportive. With the layoffs now firmly in the rearview mirror, he says the major concerns are related more to the overall health of the economy and ensuring that the Tillamook brand takes its long-standing reputation with it wherever it may go. (During his most recent trade mission to Asia this fall, Gov. John Kitzhaber actually came across Tillamook cheese on the shelves of a Hong Kong grocery store.)

“I really think the farmers have the goal that their families will continue to live and work on the farms, and that their children will keep coming back and taking over the farms,” says Rocha, a married father of four boys, two of whom will likely take the reins of his Tillamook farm, R&R Dairy, when the time comes. “For us to do that, we have to continue to have a successful brand and company, so that really always remains the focus in everything that we do.”

Jon Bell is a Portland journalist and a regular contributor to Oregon Business. Reach him at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .



 

Comments   

 
Guest
-2 #1 one who loves your cheeseGuest 2015-01-08 00:20:21
Your cheese is tasting different and I've eaten your cheese for 40 years or as long as you have been there. It isn't the same. It is tasteless,it is a different color, the sharp I bought as a gift for me at Xmas was not the same sharp I have had. It breaks my heart. Are you using GMO'S now in your process? It is not good cheese now. Im very hurt and disappointed. What's going on. Everyone in my family has noticed it. Thank you for listening. Joy Martin of Everett WA.
Quote | Report to administrator
 

More Articles

Grain Food

September 2015
Wednesday, August 19, 2015
BY JACOB PALMER

A Power Lunch at Bob's Red Mill Whole Grain Store and Restaurant.


Read more...

Baby. Boom!

September 2015
Wednesday, August 26, 2015
BY LINDA BAKER

A new co-working model disrupts office sharing, child care and work-life balance as we know it.


Read more...

Balancing Act

July/August 2015
Friday, July 10, 2015
BY DAN COOK

The Affordable Care Act has triggered a rush on health care plan redesign, a process fraught with hidden costs and consequences.


Read more...

Business partnerships: taming the three-headed monster

Contributed Blogs
Monday, July 06, 2015
070615-businessmarriagefail-thumbBY KATHERINE HEEKIN | OB GUEST COLUMNIST

Picking a business partner is not much different than choosing a spouse or life partner, and the business break-up can be as heart-wrenching and costly as divorce.


Read more...

Ranking the airlines that fly PDX

The Latest
Friday, August 14, 2015
airlinesthumbBY JACOB PALMER | DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

17 airlines make stops at Portland International Airport, but not all are created equal when it comes to customer service.


Read more...

Downtime with Debra Ringold

July/August 2015
Monday, July 13, 2015
BY JACOB PALMER

Dean of the Atkinson Graduate School of Management, Willamette University


Read more...

Back to School

September 2015
Wednesday, August 19, 2015
BY CHRIS NOBLE

Oregon is home to an abundance of gritty warehouses reborn as trendy office spaces, as well as crafty hipsters turned entrepreneurs. Does the combination yield an equally bounteous office products sector? Not so much. Occupying the limited desk jockey space are Field Notes, a spinoff of Portland’s Draplin Design Company, and Schuttenworks, known for whittling Apple device stands. For a full complement of keyboard trays, docking stations and mouse pads, check out the GroveMade line, guaranteed to boost the cachet of even the lowliest cubicle drone. 


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS