Tillamook Cheese Factory's transition

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Articles - February 2013
Monday, January 28, 2013

 

0213 Tillamook 06
Though TCCA cut nearly 50 positions last year, it still employs close to 600 people, and its Tillamook factory draws more than 1 million visitors per year.
// Photo by Sierra Breshears

Though cutting positions was a tough decision, Joe Rocha, a third-generation dairy farmer and chairman of the TCCA board, says it made the most sense from a business perspective. The creamery did what it could to assist those employees who had been impacted, he says, and since then it’s made capital investments in its facilities and even added some positions back, albeit not in packaging. At press time, Tillamook had 13 job openings posted on its website, all of them in Oregon.

“We seem to be through that,” Rocha says of the disharmony the layoffs may have caused.

Of Tillamook’s current trajectory for growth by expanding into new markets, Rocha says the board and the farmers are supportive. With the layoffs now firmly in the rearview mirror, he says the major concerns are related more to the overall health of the economy and ensuring that the Tillamook brand takes its long-standing reputation with it wherever it may go. (During his most recent trade mission to Asia this fall, Gov. John Kitzhaber actually came across Tillamook cheese on the shelves of a Hong Kong grocery store.)

“I really think the farmers have the goal that their families will continue to live and work on the farms, and that their children will keep coming back and taking over the farms,” says Rocha, a married father of four boys, two of whom will likely take the reins of his Tillamook farm, R&R Dairy, when the time comes. “For us to do that, we have to continue to have a successful brand and company, so that really always remains the focus in everything that we do.”

Jon Bell is a Portland journalist and a regular contributor to Oregon Business. Reach him at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .



 

Comments   

 
Guest
-1 #1 one who loves your cheeseGuest 2015-01-08 00:20:21
Your cheese is tasting different and I've eaten your cheese for 40 years or as long as you have been there. It isn't the same. It is tasteless,it is a different color, the sharp I bought as a gift for me at Xmas was not the same sharp I have had. It breaks my heart. Are you using GMO'S now in your process? It is not good cheese now. Im very hurt and disappointed. What's going on. Everyone in my family has noticed it. Thank you for listening. Joy Martin of Everett WA.
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