On the road

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Articles - Nov/Dec 2012
Monday, November 05, 2012
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On the road
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Five minutes from Newberg, Dundee is a tiny town with a population of only 3,200 and few of Newberg’s advantages. It has no historic downtown, few commercial businesses and fewer jobs, no university or legendary philanthropists. Only about 25 Dundee residents have jobs in town, with the remaining workforce of around 1,225 leaving each day for jobs elsewhere.

If it doesn’t have the critical mass and growing velocity of Newberg, its plans for the future are no less hopeful. Like Newberg, it has the wine industry (most of its largest employers are wineries), natural beauty and also a chance to begin a reinvention with the new bypass. While Newberg may have McMinnville envy, Dundee sits in the shadow of Newberg, but there is a partnership there, and its role in making the bypass a reality was large.

“Dundee is part of the overall community,” Newberg mayor Andrews says. “Through Ted Crawford’s efforts, we got the bypass done.”

Crawford, Dundee’s mayor, ran for office specifically to help get the bypass built, understanding, as did others, that traffic-crushed Dundee didn’t have a chance for a more vibrant future without it.

He sees economic possibilities in destination tourism and in developing Dundee’s wine identity, along with good food. The high-end Paulée, with its hot Portland chef, opened there this year, adding to the Red Hills Market, Tina’s and Red Hills Provincial Dining.

Ecotourism is another possibility. Crawford helped spearhead the creation of the Chehalem Paddle Launch with Newberg, an effort that won the towns a regional cooperation award and finally gave Dundee access to the Willamette River. He would like to see a series of trails that connect to the river.

“Our biggest competitor is Carlton, but they don’t have the vistas or the Willamette River,” he says. “If we had a Ken Wright, we’d really get somewhere.”

Wright, founder of Ken Wright Cellars, has restored a train station in Carlton as a tasting room and retail shop, has plans for other restorations and is deeply involved in the community and in launching events. Bill Stoller of Stoller Winery is doing something similar in Dayton.

Dundee is on top of several big projects, such as a new $13 million sewage treatment plant and a $3.8 million fire station. There are plans to build sidewalks, add streetlights and repave OR 99W, its main street, now that the bypass will reduce traffic. “It will be a gigantic face-lift,” says Crawford.

“We have the geography, we have the bypass. Now we can be a stand-alone community,” says Rollin Soles, the winemaker at Argyle Winery, one of Dundee’s largest employers. “It’s a struggle to maintain commerce here. But we are here to stay.”

Robin Doussard is editor-in-chief of Oregon Business. She can be reached at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .



 

Comments   

 
Guest
-1 #1 Not happyGuest 2012-11-09 00:26:00
Yea! Great! Not! The bypass is running thru our back yard, literally! Taking away our view of the fields and tress and instead getting to look at cars and hear them. We moved to Dundee to get away from cars and people, not to have it in our back yard. Thanks a lot!! Great planning people!
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Guest
0 #2 Agree with aboveGuest 2012-11-15 00:06:21
I'm glad the traffic will be less going through Newberg and Dundee. But I also empathize with the above comment as the bypass will also be right in front of my house. Cutting down two beautiful HUGE trees. And my view from my bedroom window will now be a highway. Well here's hoping we can sell our house before all that happens.
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Guest
0 #3 Another guestGuest 2012-11-20 15:36:00
The most expensive project in ODOT history to save six minutes driving time. This 3.5 mile two lane highway is an economic waste, besides being dangerous. It is projected to only carry 40 percent of the traffic on the route. The rest of 99W through the area remains in pitiful condition.
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Guest
0 #4 Excited about the possibilitiesGuest 2012-11-21 14:47:18
I would love to see Dundee revitalized! It is such a prime location in wine country. As it is, I've avoided this stretch of road for decades -- not only Newberg and Dundee, but McMinnville and the entire route to Lincoln City due to the traffic. (I once spent more than 30 minutes between Newberg and Dundee. That was the tipping point.) I feel for the people who are losing land and views. I hope the benefit to the community will make it worthwhile.
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Guest
-1 #5 Long Overdue...Guest 2012-11-27 17:02:30
Sorry about the folks who will be impacted by the new Bypass however its been years in the making so if you didn't plan accordingly, you're going to be impacted. I disagree with one commenter...it won't save 6 minues off going around Dundee and Newberg...try more like about 20 mins or more.
This project is long overdue. I hope it also leads to construction of the long delayed I-5 to 99W connector project.
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Guest
+1 #6 Plan accordingly???Guest 2012-11-28 23:26:38
I've lived in my current home since 2008. When we bought the house we were not aware of the bypass project and did not know it was going to be in front of our house. As someone who is not a long time Newberg resident the bypass project is not something I could have "planned accordingly" for! And even in the few years we have lived here the bypass plan has changed many times.
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Guest
0 #7 Yes, Plan AccordinglyGuest 2012-11-28 23:45:57
The concept of a Newberg Dundee Bypass has been tossed around since the late 1970s. The 1995 Oregon Legislature passed a bill allowing for a Newberg Dundee Bypass toll road to be built; it was not built 'cause it was determined at that time not to be feasible. An Australian Company was going to build the Bypass but its investigation into the project revealed it was not financially do-able.
Do a google search for the ND Bypass and you will see articles going back at least 20 years on the Bypass. If your Realtor didn't disclose this information to you when you bought your house then you might have a case against them. My girlfriends parents were going to buy a piece of property along the golf course at the west end of Newberg near the hospital about 10 years ago and I strongly advised them not to 'cause the Bypass will go right by it one day (this will be phase II)
This Bypass is not new news...its been in the works for a long time. Sorry it will impact you.
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Guest
0 #8 True but.....Guest 2012-11-28 23:56:39
It may be old news to you, but as I stated before I am not a long time resident of the Newberg area. I grew up in Eastern Oregon and what happens in Yamhill county is not news over there. I am not trying to start anything with you, just telling it from the thoughts of someone who will be directly affected by this. Our house will not sell for what we still owe on it at this time, so we are just hoping that in the next few years we can put it up for sale and move before the construction starts.
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Guest
-1 #9 Resident(Former )of Newberg..Guest 2014-01-05 13:07:32
People:Before you invest in a home,DO THE RESEARCH.I spent much time calling(wasnt even online to deeply investigate the"bypass"that ,indeed,has been in the making since I did my homework in 1996.Contact O.D.O.T:I bought in Beautiful SunnyCrest.Dayt on Av./N.side were going to be a problem.All homes/sites should be researched before you invest in something as sweet as your own home.Dont blame Bypass:It's called"Relief". Coping w/ALL those trucks everyday was nauseating!
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Guest
+1 #10 Really??Guest 2014-01-08 00:28:20
For all of you that say do RESEARCH, think about it people. When you have lived in the same house FOR YEARS it's kind of hard to do RESEARCH and PLAN ACCORDINGLY when the By Pass location wasn't set into stone or even known back then!!!!!! It's really easy to give unsolicited advice isn't it?
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Guest
0 #11 Really??Guest 2014-01-08 14:46:36
The Newberg Graphic and the Oregonian (or Oregonlive.com) had numerous articles about the Bypass. ODOT also publicized notices about hearings and had a few open houses around the area which I went to several of and they explained the corridor and impacts on residents and businesses.
It helps when you read the news and stay cognizant of whats going on in the world around you.
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Guest
0 #12 BypassGuest 2014-01-09 03:30:12
Well I have been in my home since spring of 2008. The bypass will be literally right in front of my house. When we first moved in the bypass was not finalized and the route it was going to take had not been decided yet. There were no meetings or hearings at that time that we were made aware of. And sorry but I don't read the Newberg Graphic.
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