Transparent electronics

| Print |  Email
Articles - Nov/Dec 2012
Monday, November 05, 2012

BY LINDA BAKER

1112 NextThe 2011 Corning Glass video sensation, A Day Made of Glass, depicted a future in which people surf the web on a glass tabletop and check the weather on a bathroom mirror.  Now engineers at Oregon State University, a pioneer in the field of transparent electronics, may be one step closer to making the Corning Glass vision a reality. The development hinges on the use of zinc tin oxide (ZTO) and a device called a memristor, expected to be the next big thing in electronic-storage technology. Although flash-memory computer chips are now embedded in almost all modern electronics, flash is nearing the end of its useful life, says John Conley, an OSU professor of engineering. Memristors offer opportunities to create even smaller, faster storage products, says Conley, whose research shows that ZTO, a cheap and environmentally benign compound, could be used to control memristive memory. He says the compound is also see-through and thus a good fit for transparent electronics, so ZTO could be used in flat-panel and liquid-crystal displays. The next step is to improve the material’s endurance and speed, he says. Conley muses on the Corning vision of web-accessible shop windows and car windshields. “Pretty cool,” he says.  

 

More Articles

Photo Diary: Forest Grove Farmers Market

The Latest
Thursday, May 14, 2015
IMG 8469BY JASON E. KAPLAN | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

There are more than 160 farmers markets in Oregon, contributing an estimated $50 million in sales, according to the Oregon Farmers Markets Association. We checked in on the Forest Grove market, which for several years has brought local produce and food vendors to Main Street in the center of town.


Read more...

6 development projects reshaping Bend

The Latest
Thursday, April 09, 2015
bendthumbBY JACOB PALMER | DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

Bend has reclaimed its prerecession title as one of the fastest growing cities in the country.


Read more...

Picture This

May 2015
Monday, April 27, 2015
BY JACOB PALMER

As a general rule, the more people with autism can be provided with visual cues, the better they will be able to understand and manage their environment. It’s a lesson Tom Keating learned well. The 61-year-old Eugene grant writer spent 31 years taking care of his autistic brother James, and in the late 1980s developed a spreadsheet that created a series of nonsense characters that grew or shrank depending on how much money James had in his account. 


Read more...

Photo Log: The 100 Best Green Workplaces in Oregon event

The Latest
Wednesday, May 27, 2015
greenthumbPHOTOS BY JASON E. KAPLAN

Oregon Business celebrated the 100 Best Green Workplaces with an awards luncheon at the Nines Hotel in downtown Portland.


Read more...

Eco Zoned

June 2015
Friday, May 22, 2015
BY HANNAH WALLACE

Travelers have always come to Oregon for its natural beauty. But will the increasing popularity of agritourism, European-style hiking getaways and forest resorts relax Oregon's notoriously strict land-use laws?


Read more...

Make the Case

May 2015
Monday, April 27, 2015

10 briefcases that mean business.


Read more...

100 Best Green Workplaces in Oregon

June 2015
Friday, May 22, 2015
BY KIM MOORE

As momentum grows at the state level to introduce far-reaching environmental regulations, such as carbon pricing and the Clean Fuels Program, Oregon employers continue to go the extra mile to create green workplaces for their employees.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS