Live, work, play: Gale Castillo

| Print |  Email
Articles - October 2012
Monday, September 24, 2012
1012 LiveWorkPlay GaleCastillo
Gale Castillo was the first in her family to graduate high school or go to college.
// Photo by Sierra Breshears

BY LINDA BAKER

Gale Castillo co-founded the Portland-based Hispanic Metropolitan Chamber in 1994 and became its president in 2001. She is also the co-owner of Cascade Centers, which provides employee-assistance program services and staff development throughout the United States. Her public service experience includes working as an assistant to former Gov. Neil Goldschmidt and as a job-training manager for the state’s economic development department. Castillo, 59, also has worked for AT&T, Pacific Northwest Bell and RESTOR Communications. She serves on the Linfield College board of trustees, the Portland mayor’s economic cabinet and Multnomah County’s business advisory council. She has three adult sons and lives in Southwest Portland with her husband, Jerry.

THEY SAY I’M …

“Very family-oriented, committed, very focused on whatever project I’m doing, whether it’s dinner or running the chamber. I’m very outcomes-oriented. What makes me happy is when I achieve a goal I’ve been working toward. It gives me a real sense of satisfaction. I also enjoy being with friends and sharing with them great music and good food.”

DOWNTIME

“We like to travel throughout Mexico and Europe. We took a cruise to Venice, the Greek islands, Barcelona, then to Amsterdam. That was probably the last dream vacation we took, about four years ago. The rest of the trips have been to Bend, wine country, Walla Walla. I like to cook. We make paella, Italian food, chicken piccata. I do a lot of walking on the different trails in Portland. I used to run, but not anymore.”

THE WORK FILES

“The first job I had was in college working for the McMinnville News-Register. The most interesting and the worst job was being a telephone operator down in Oakland. It was interesting because the calls were very different. But I got some creeps, as well. At Cascade Centers, we support the well being of thousands of employees and their families through counseling and other resources.”

NEXT GENERATION

“For me this has been a great ride. I was the first in my family to graduate from high school, the first to go to college, the first to get a master’s degree. Like many of my peers in my community, we are the first. Our parents were not doctors, lawyers or corporate executives. With that comes a learning curve. Now we’re trying to share our learning with the next generation of leaders coming up.”

CLASS DISTINCTIONS

“I come from a blue-collar background. My mother was a factory worker; she worked for Perky Pies, which makes turnover pies. My father delivered propane. My mother didn’t want me to work as a kid. She had to work when she was 13, picking cotton in Texas. She swore that was something I was not going to do. So education was very important to her. Education, as we all know, is a life-changer.”

 

Correction: This article has been amended to correct where Castillo's mother picked cotton. It was in Texas, not California.

 

More Articles

The short list: Holiday habits of six Oregon CEOs

The Latest
Thursday, December 11, 2014
121214-xmaslist1BY JACOB PALMER | OB DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

We ask business and nonprofit leaders how they survive the season.


Read more...

Justice for All

January-Powerbook 2015
Thursday, December 11, 2014
BY JESSICA RIDGWAY

Lawger upends the typical hourly based fee model by letting clients determine the cost.


Read more...

The short list: 4 companies engaged in a battle of the paddles

The Latest
Thursday, December 04, 2014
pingpongthumbBY JACOB PALMER | OB DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

Nothing says startup culture like a ping pong table in the office, lounge or lobby.


Read more...

OB Poll: Wineries and groceries

News
Friday, October 24, 2014

24-winethumbA majority of respondents agreed: Local vineyards should remain Oregon-owned and quality is the most important factor when determining where to eat or buy groceries.


Read more...

Growing a mobility cluster

News
Friday, October 31, 2014
0414 bikes bd2f6052BY LINDA BAKER | OB EDITOR

Why are there so few transportation startups in Portland?  The city’s leadership in bike, transit and pedestrian transportation has been well-documented.  But that was then — when government and nonprofits paved the way for a new, less auto centric way of life.


Read more...

Corner Office: Steve Tatone

January-Powerbook 2015
Saturday, December 13, 2014

Seven tidbits about the president and CEO of AKT Group.


Read more...

Editor's Letter: Power Play

January-Powerbook 2015
Thursday, December 11, 2014

There’s a fascinating article in the December issue of the Harvard Business Review about a profound power shift taking place in business and society. It’s a long read, but the gist revolves around the tension between “old power” and “new power” as a driver of transformation. Here’s an excerpt:

Old power works like a currency. It is held by few. Once gained, it is jealously guarded, and the powerful have a substantial store of it to spend. It is closed, inaccessible, and leader-driven. It downloads, and it captures.

New power operates differently, like a current. It is made by many. It is open, participatory, and peer-driven. It uploads, and it distributes. Like water or electricity, it’s most forceful when it surges. The goal with new power is not to hoard it but to channel it.

The authors, Henry Timms and Jeremy Heimans, don’t necessarily favor one form of power over another but merely outline how power is transitioning, and how companies can take advantage of these changes to strengthen their positions in the marketplace. 

Our Powerbook issue might be viewed as a case study in the new-power transition. This annual book of lists provides information on leading businesses, nonprofits and universities in the state. Most of the featured companies are entrenched power players now pursuing more flexible and less hierarchical approaches to doing business. Law firms, for example, are adopting new technologies and fee structures to make legal services more accessible and affordable.

This month we also take a look at a controversial new U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission rule requiring public companies to disclose the median pay of workers, as well as the ratio between CEO and median-worker pay. 

Part of the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial reform law, the rule will compel public companies to be more open about employee compensation, with the assumption that greater transparency will improve corporate performance and, perhaps, help address one of the major challenges of our time: income inequality.

New power is not only about strategy and tactics, the Harvard Business Review authors say. “The ultimate questions are ethical. The big question is whether new power can genuinely serve the common good and confront society’s most intractable problems.”

That sounds like a call to arms. Or a New Year’s resolution. Old power or new, the goals are the same: to be a force for positive change in the world. Happy 2015!

— Linda


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS