Sponsored by Oregon Business

Downtown Dayton's dawn

| Print |  Email
Articles - September 2012
Monday, August 27, 2012


0912 GamePlan DowntownDayton 02
Above: A few of Dayton's downtown buildings have been refurbished in the past year.
Below: The historic square in the middle of downtown is one of Dayton's biggest assets.
// Photos by Sierra Breshears
0912 GamePlan DowntownDayton 03

Over the past year, three historic downtown buildings have been refreshed, and in August the town began work on a strategic plan, according to Kelly Haverkate, program manager for the Dayton Community Development Association (DCDA). She says the plan, to be completed in December, will be used to guide the redevelopment of the downtown, along with being a business-recruiting tool.

Stoller wants to find developers for his properties, and he would like to see multiuse or even residential projects in them. “And Jim Seufert is there with his winery,” Stoller says. “It would be great to have a few more. We need that critical mass.”

Seufert founded his winery in 2005 and opened his tasting room in downtown Dayton in 2007. He also is on the board of the DCDA. Seufert thinks the town should build on its food roots: its agricultural history, wine country location and nearby organic farms. In addition, the town is home to the highly regarded Joel Palmer House restaurant.

“Each little town needs a clear calling card. Carlton has really staked out the wine angle,” says Seufert. “Because of Dayton’s history, food is a natural fit.”

What excites Seufert is the idea for a $5 million, 15,000-square-foot food-business incubator on or nearby the central square with three components: a shared production facility, retail space to sell food products made on site, and room for training and meetings. He says the DCDA is working on this idea and exploring setting up a nonprofit group to organize it and look for funding.

“The key is to figure out what Dayton wants to be, needs to be. And then you market it. We’ve always struggled with that,” says Stoller. “It’s going to take a long view and 25 years to get there. But I think I have that time to see it through.”


More Articles

100 Best Nonprofits: Working for equality inside and out

October 2015
Wednesday, September 30, 2015

Striving for social equity is the mission of many nonprofits, and this year’s 100 Best Nonprofits to Work For in Oregon survey shows employees are most satisfied with their organizations’ fair treatment of differing racial, gender, disability, age and economic groups. But as a national discourse about racial discrimination and equity for low-income groups takes center stage, data show Oregon’s 100 Best Nonprofits to Work For still need to make progress on addressing these issues within their own organizations.


The Shift to Community Health Care

November/December 2015
Wednesday, October 28, 2015

A conversation with Patrick Curran, CEO of CareOregon.


Straight shooter

Linda Baker
Thursday, October 08, 2015
100815-bradleyBY LINDA BAKER

In an era dominated by self-promotion and marketing speak, John Bradley, CEO of R&H Construction, is a breath of fresh air.


The Cover Story

The Latest
Tuesday, October 06, 2015
100515-cover1015-news-thumbBY CHRIS NOBLE

As we worked on the October cover, it became evident that Nick Symmonds is a hard man to catch — even when he’s not hotfooting it around a track.


Tech to Table

November/December 2015
Wednesday, October 28, 2015

A Power Lunch at the Barn Light Cafe & Bar in Eugene.


Tinker, Tailor, Portland Maker

November/December 2015
Wednesday, October 28, 2015

The artisan generation redefines manufacturing.


Photos: 100 Best Nonprofits to Work For in Oregon awards dinner

The Latest
Thursday, October 01, 2015
100best202thumbPHOTOS BY JASON E. KAPLAN

Images from the big 2015 celebration of worker-friendly organizations that make a difference.

Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02