Saving today for tomorrow

| Print |  Email
Articles - June 2012
Tuesday, May 29, 2012

BY JON BELL

0612 GamePlan CyArkOregon 01
Above: Years of vandalism and wear have been hard on Peterson's Rock Garden, a popular attraction in Redmond.. It is one of dozens of endangeredd sites in Oregon that may be digitally archived through CyArk Oregon.
Below: Danish immigrant Rasmus Petersen created his quirky rock garden to honor his adopted country.
0612 GamePlan CyArkOregon 02

Petersen’s Rock Garden in Redmond is an eclectic, four-acre collection of regional rocks and miniature monuments. Amassed by Rasmus Petersen throughout the 1930s and 1940s, it is considered one of the city’s most unique attractions. It is also one of the Historic Preservation League of Oregon’s most endangered places.

So when a contractor accidentally damaged one of the garden’s unique stone bridges earlier this year, it might have seemed like yet another blow against the garden, which has long been plagued by vandalism and theft.

But thanks to an innovative effort to document the garden with laser scanning and other technologies, the stone bridge can be rebuilt to its exact original specifications — and preserved for the roadside tourists of tomorrow.

“It’s a full archiving of a site,” says Paul Tice, a visualization specialist with i-Ten, a Portland company specializing in laser scanning and other geospatial data. “The goal is to try to capture everything known about a site.”

The movement is bigger than Tice or i-Ten, however. It’s actually an effort to establish an Oregon incarnation of CyArk, an international nonprofit that digitally preserves cultural heritage sites around the world.

Using laser scanning, digital modeling and other technologies, CyArk collects and archives data and then makes it available to the public. Heritage sites documented so far include the monoliths on Rapa Nui, Mount Rushmore and the Hindu temple Angkor Wat. The information can be used for education, re-creation or efforts to bolster tourism. According to Tice, visits to Mount Rushmore tripled after it was documented on CyArk.

The idea to create a state-level version of CyArk, which will be called CyArk Oregon, came after Tice heard a talk by Tom Greaves, executive director of CyArk. It was Greaves who ultimately decided to bring CyArk to Oregon. Peggy Moretti, executive director of the preservation league, has also been involved in what Tice says is a large collaboration.

Those guiding the effort in Oregon hope to have a board of directors established this summer. The company Tice works for, i-Ten, donated the time and equipment to document Petersen’s Rock Garden. Future projects could be funded by grants, donations or tourism revenue.

Initially, CyArk Oregon will focus on about 100 sites in Oregon, including the Egyptian Theater in Coos Bay and the Tillamook Bay Lifesaving Station. Data and information about each site would be hosted on CyArk servers and could be used in mobile apps or other interactive formats.

“Documenting sites like this will really be a way for people to explore them forever,” Tice says.

 

Comments   

 
Tina Pfeiffer
+4 #1 RE: Saving today for tomorrowTina Pfeiffer 2012-05-29 17:22:31
This is very happy news! The rock garden is a special place in Oregon and I'd be very sad to see it in any worse repair than it is or to disappear so others could not enjoy it.
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
Allen Roy
+2 #2 RE: Saving today for tomorrowAllen Roy 2012-06-06 19:13:24
For those with Facebook accounts, visit "Petersen Rock Garden". We have lots of photos, old and new. And reminiscents. And "Friends of Petersen Rock Gardens" post updates on what they are trying to do to help restore and preserve the gardens (along with historical groups in Oregon).
Quote | Report to administrator
 

More Articles

No Boundaries

June 2015
Friday, May 22, 2015
BY AMY MILSHTEIN

Floor plans embrace the great wide open.


Read more...

An uncertain future

Guest Blog
Thursday, May 21, 2015
norristhumbBY JASON NORRIS | GUEST BLOGGER

Uncertainty is a part of doing business, whether in through the lens of investment opportunities and risks or the business of running an enterprise.


Read more...

Cherry Raincoat

June 2015
Tuesday, May 26, 2015
BY LINDA BAKER

Spring rains are the bane of an Oregon cherry farmer’s existence. Even a few sprinkles can crack the fruit so badly it’s not worth picking. Science to the rescue: Researchers at Oregon State University have developed a spray-on film that cuts rain-related cracking in half, potentially saving a season’s crop. The coating, patented as SureSeal, is made from natural chemicals similar to those found in the skins of cherries: cellulose, palm oil-based wax and calcium.


Read more...

Intrepid reporter checks out ZoomCare rebrand

The Latest
Wednesday, May 27, 2015
dentistthumbPHOTOS BY JASON E. KAPLAN

Like all good journalists, OB editorial staff typically eschew freebies. But health care costs being what they are, digital news editor Jacob Palmer couldn't resist ZoomCare's offer of a three-in-one (cleaning, exam, whitening) dental office visit, guaranteed to take no more than 57 minutes. 


Read more...

100 Best Green Workplaces in Oregon

June 2015
Friday, May 22, 2015
BY KIM MOORE

As momentum grows at the state level to introduce far-reaching environmental regulations, such as carbon pricing and the Clean Fuels Program, Oregon employers continue to go the extra mile to create green workplaces for their employees.


Read more...

Up in the Air

June 2015
Friday, May 22, 2015
BY ANNIE ELLISON

Portland tech veteran Ben Berry is leaving his post as Portland’s chief technology officer for a full-time role producing unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) aimed at first responders and the military. Berry’s AirShip Technologies Group is poised to be on the ground floor of an industry that will supply drones to as many as 100,000 police, fire and emergency agencies nationwide. He reveals the plan for takeoff.


Read more...

Fixing Oregon’s broken roads

The Latest
Tuesday, June 09, 2015
RUCCostComparison rev4-30BY KIM MOORE | RESEARCH EDITOR

The technology at the center of Oregon’s road usage fee reform.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS