Sponsored by Oregon Business

Developing districts

| Print |  Email
Articles - June 2012
Tuesday, May 29, 2012

Currently there are five official eco-district projects in Portland: the Lloyd District, Foster Green, Gateway, South of Market and South Waterfront. The Hawthorne business district and its associated neighborhoods are also jumping into the fray. Michele Machado, the volunteer coordinator for the Hawthorne eco-district, says the effort started about six months ago when the Hawthorne Boulevard Business Association expressed interest in how to take sustainability to the next step. The association received a $6,000 grant from Venture Portland to develop a planning framework. Machado hopes to come up with three to five projects that the association and five nearby neighborhood associations can agree upon in early June and then the projects will be prioritized and launched over the next few years. She hopes to have a formal eco-district process in place early next year.

Beaverton and Hillsboro are working with the Portland Sustainability Institute on their own eco-districts. So far, no Oregon projects are under way outside of the Portland metro area.

Naomi Cole, Portland Sustainability Institute’s eco-districts program director, says the districts follow a five-step template. First the district organizational structure is set, followed by an assessment of needs, project feasibility studies, project implementation and ongoing district monitoring. With the exception of the Lloyd District, the other four districts are in the feasibility study stage. Hawthorne is beginning the assessment stage.

Ideally, says Heinicke, an eco-district will be an ongoing, constantly evolving place where solving one issue leads to another issue needing resolution. “This is probably not something that’s going to be built out and just be done.”

The Lloyd District is home to major business players and eco-district supporters such as the Oregon Convention Center, PacifiCorp, the Lloyd Center Mall, the Portland Trail Blazers and the Rose Quarter sports and entertainment arenas, and major commercial real estate players such as Langley Investment Properties. Heinicke says the strong business community involvement means proposals will be carefully scrutinized to ensure they make good business sense. For example, the district will adopt guidelines for building remodels that call for energy-efficient measures that will save businesses money, not measures that are green at the expense of the bottom line.

“It has to be the right thing to do and it has to make financial sense,” Heinicke says. “These are the lenses through which we evaluate what we do and don’t do.”


More Articles

Storyteller in Chief: Power Player

September 2015
Wednesday, August 19, 2015

In 1996, after a 17-year career in the destination marketing industry, where I gained national standing as the CEO of the Convention & Visitors Association of Lane County, I was recruited by the founders of a new professional basketball league for women. The American Basketball League (ABL) hoped to leverage the success of the 1996 USA women’s national team at the Atlanta Olympics — much like USA Soccer is now leveraging the U.S. Women’s National Team’s victory in the World Cup. The ABL wanted a team in Portland, and they wanted me to be its general manager.


Cutting Edge

October 2015
Monday, September 28, 2015

“There wasn’t a reason shaving with a straight razor should have been taken over by shaving with disposable razors.”


Salad Days

October 2015
Monday, September 28, 2015

How Portland's Garden Bar plans to become the Starbucks of salad.


Child care challenge

September 2015
Wednesday, August 26, 2015
0927OHSUhealthystarts-thumbBY KIM MOORE AND LINDA BAKER

Child care in Oregon is expensive and hard to find. We delved into the numbers and talked to a few executives and managers about day care costs, accessibility and work-life balance.


Big Trouble in China?

Guest Blog
Tuesday, August 18, 2015
0818-wellmanthumbBY JASON NORRIS | CFA

Earlier this month, the People’s Bank of China (PBoC) announced they were going to devalue their currency, the Renminbi. While the amount of the targeted change was to be roughly 2 percent, investors read a lot more into the move. The Renminbi had been gradually appreciating against the U.S. dollar (see chart) as to attempt to alleviate concerns of being labeled a currency manipulator.


Social media transforming sports business

The Latest
Thursday, September 24, 2015

The traditional model of sports teams using paid media to get their message across is disappearing as teams look instead to social media to interact with fans.


Photos: 100 Best Nonprofits to Work For in Oregon awards dinner

The Latest
Thursday, October 01, 2015
100best202thumbPHOTOS BY JASON E. KAPLAN

Images from the big 2015 celebration of worker-friendly organizations that make a difference.

Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02