Sponsored by Lane Powell

Tenant trade

| Print |  Email
Articles - May 2012
Monday, April 23, 2012


0512_Dispatches_Retail_GraphIndeed, some nontraditional tenants, such as the Lloyd Center L.A. Fitness, do benefit the establishment as a whole by producing traffic that would not otherwise exist, says T.J. Drought of Glimcher.

When neighborhood residents come to the gym to work out, he says, “it’s just another time during the week when our shopper is going to be at the Lloyd Center.”

Though Oregon retail centers have had to adjust their leasing strategies, they have fared far better than their counterparts in other parts of the country who have filled vacancies with enterprises like indoor gardens, putting greens, dog runs, aquariums and casinos.

While the average retail vacancy rate in the U.S. peaked at 7.9% during the recession, it only reached 6.7% in Portland, 6.6% in Salem and 5.4% in Eugene, according to CoStar. (The vacancy rate in Atlanta, by contrast, peaked at 10.7%.)

Oregon suffered less in part because its cities’ urban growth boundaries prevented the type of endless, sprawling development that breeds an overabundance of shopping malls. Because of this supply constraint, retail inventory in Portland only grew by 13% over the past decade, compared to 17% nationwide. (Portland is the only Oregon market for which CoStar provides comprehensive coverage.)

“The local government and culture in Portland tends to backlash against large developments such as Super Wal-Mart and Target that the rest of the country loves,” says Carlos Ortea, a CoStar real estate economist. “It’s more of a culture of wanting to have smaller spaces, and less.”

Jesse Tron of the International Council of Shopping Centers says it’s too soon to know whether nontraditional tenants will become long-term fixtures in the shopping centers they are currently inhabiting.

“My guess is that a lot of centers would bring back the more traditional retail tenant,” he says, “but it all depends on if they see added value with nontraditional tenants in the mix.”



 

More Articles

Transportation Fairness Alliance holds demonstration in Pioneer Square

The Latest
Wednesday, January 14, 2015
IMG 3367BY JACOB PALMER | OB DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

Portland's cab companies urged city hall for consideration as officials weigh new rules for Uber and other ridesharing companies.


Read more...

Money Talks

March 2015
Saturday, February 21, 2015
BY LINDA BAKER | OB EDITOR

Will community banks survive the digital age? Three CEOs peer into banking's crystal ball.


Read more...

The week journalism died

Linda Baker
Sunday, February 15, 2015
deadjournalismthumbBY LINDA BAKER | OB EDITOR

As the investigation against the governor moves forward, those of us in the news business should reflect on our own potential for subverting the democratic process.


Read more...

10 Twitter highlights from #OR100Best

The Latest
Friday, February 27, 2015
100bestBY OB STAFF

Oregon Business held its  22nd annual 100 Best Companies to Work For in Oregon celebration Thursday night in the Oregon Convention Center.


Read more...

Chronicling Gov. Kitzhaber's march to resignation

The Latest
Wednesday, February 11, 2015
021115-kitzhaber-jekaplan14-thumbBY JACOB PALMER | OB DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

Recapping a wild week featuring plenty of will he or won't he resign drama.


Read more...

Closing the Gap: The two Oregons and the way forward

February 2015
Monday, January 26, 2015
BY JOE CORTRIGHT

"Nostalgia is not an economic strategy."


Read more...

The city as startup

Guest Blog
Wednesday, January 14, 2015
011415 citystartup-thumbBY NISHANT BHAJARIA | OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR

Startups in the growth phase are associated with a fresh infusion of capital — human and financial — a curiosity factor and products to disrupt the market and drive demand. Portland’s economy gives off the same aroma.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS