Home Back Issues May 2012 The rise of the mommy economy

The rise of the mommy economy

| Print |  Email
Articles - May 2012
Monday, April 23, 2012
Article Index
The rise of the mommy economy
Page 2
Page 3
Page 4
Mothers of invention
Mothers of invention 2

Aiming to be part of that dialogue, major brands are doing more than placing ads on mommy blogger sites or getting moms to blog about specific products — strategies many marketers say are already becoming passé. As Page puts it, today’s companies should “join the conversation, not interrupt it.” That philosophy informs Huggies’ “mom-inspired grant program,” which awards $15,000 to moms to help turn homegrown parenting ideas into innovative products. It also explains why gDiapers has 36,000 active Facebook fans and 500 parent posts a day on topics such as home births and breastfeeding. “Even though it’s a diaper brand, what’s bringing people to our site is that we’ve created a community of people who share similar values,” says president Kim Graham-Nye.

Mom-oriented companies are now building and targeting communities offline as well. Thus gDiapers hosts regular “gTeas,” and Schotland spreads the word about Plum District as co-president elect of her school’s PTA. Cynics might claim that such mom-specific community-building, along with a focus on “power moms” and the “mom market,” is simply another way to co-opt contemporary motherhood.

A hallowed political symbol, mothers have always been supported more in theory than in practice; their actual work, be it housework, childcare or business, is often dismissed or devalued. But the increase in women- and mom-owned businesses, and the values such companies embody, suggests the scales are beginning to tip in favor of maternal empowerment. Today’s flexible, networked, product-recommendation driven entrepreneurial culture is also about as close as it gets to a multi-tasking, advice-giving, and community-building mompreneur. Mothers are natural innovators, says Maria Bailey of BSM Media, noting “mompreneurship tracks closely when mom has a baby. Suddenly she has all this new need for products, and starts to see that the product she needs she can’t find.”

In the past, business has been slow to recognize and nurture that potential. Not today, when signs point to a society making way for the new, 21st century mother of invention.

 



 

More Articles

Why I became an educator

News
Tuesday, March 04, 2014
03.04.14 thumbnail teachBY DEBRA RINGOLD | GUEST CONTRIBUTOR

How can we strengthen the performance of institutions charged with teaching what Francis Fukuyama calls the social virtues (reciprocity, moral obligation, duty toward community, and trust) necessary for successful markets and democracy itself?


Read more...

Airbnb laws will hurt Portland’s newest company

News
Wednesday, April 23, 2014
airbnb-logoBY CLIFF HOCKLEY | OB GUEST CONTRIBUTOR

Proposed regulations protect Portland’s strict zoning codes and hotel operators, but they may have an adverse effect on Airbnb’s business.


Read more...

Powerlist: Meeting perspectives

March 2014
Tuesday, February 25, 2014

BY BRANDON SAWYER

A conversation about the event-planning industry with sales directors from McMenamins and the Portland Art Museum. 


Read more...

Closing the gap: Community colleges and workforce training

News
Thursday, March 27, 2014
03.27.14 thumb collegeBY MARY SPILDE | OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR

Community college career, technical and workforce programs present an opportunity to bring business and education together as never before.


Read more...

Revolution in print, pixels and passion

News
Tuesday, March 11, 2014
RyanFrankNewsBY MARK BLAINE | OB BLOGGER

The publisher of the Emerald Media Group moves on, leaving a cutting edge media group that depends on business acumen for its survival.


Read more...

Banishing oil burners reaps benefits for schools

News
Tuesday, April 01, 2014
04.02.14 thumb co2schoolsBY APRIL STREETER | OB CONTRIBUTOR

Three years ago, PPS set out to begin to convert the 1930s-era boilers from diesel/bunker fuel to cleaner-burning natural gas. Oregon’s largest school district has realized impressive carbon dioxide emissions reductions, setting an example for public and private institutions.


Read more...

Rapid ascent

March 2014
Tuesday, February 25, 2014
IMG 4255-2BY AMY MILSHTEIN

Kelly Dachtler, president of The Clymb, redefines outdoor retail.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS