Cart culture

| Print |  Email
Articles - April 2012
Thursday, March 22, 2012

 

0412_Dispatches_NonFoodCarts_01
Lisa Marie Bucci runs Salon Bucci, a movie-set-themed hair salon cart, in the Food Pavilion near Southeast 50th and Division. Finding her next meal is never a problem, she says. "I'm just waiting for a massage trailer to move in next door to me."
// Photo by Alexandra Shyshkina

The city requires that non-food cart owners follow standard procedure when setting up their businesses: They must register, attain vending permits, pay city and county business license and income taxes, and follow zoning and building codes. But since they don’t have to pass health inspections like their counterparts in the food industry, no government bureau keeps watch over them — or has an idea how many exist.

Loren Guerriero, community outreach coordinator at Mercy Corps Northwest, says the market has yet to determine whether the cart model is viable for non-food enterprises.

“A lot of these new non-food carts have yet to be tested,” he says. “The majority of businesses fail within the first three years, and many of these carts started in the last three years.”

Owners cite the desire to stand out in a market saturated by the same types of businesses as a primary reason for going mobile.

“I wanted a hook,” says stylist Robin Carlisle, who opened the Holiday Hair Studio salon last March in a pink and silver Kenskill trailer on Southeast 28th. “I thought if you can do food in a cart, you can do hair in a cart.”

Her scheme worked: the novelty of the hair-in-a-cart idea attracted the attention of publications ranging from the Portland Mercury to New York magazine to the Apartment Therapy design blog, and within eight months, she’d amassed 200 regular clients — a feat that would have otherwise taken four to five years.

In February, Carlisle moved into a brick-and-mortar salon half a block from her former parking spot. “Having the cart first was the only way I would ever be able to have a full-on salon like I have now,” she says.

 



 

More Articles

Uncertainty about convention center hotel could cost Portland an NBA All-Star Game

The Latest
Wednesday, February 18, 2015
463545460BY JACOB PALMER | OB DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

NBA commissioner: "I would love to end up having an All-Star Game in Portland. It's really just a function of ensuring that we can fit in town."


Read more...

Downtown flower shop readies for the Valentine's Day rush

The Latest
Monday, February 09, 2015
021015-giffords-thumbBY MEGHAN NOLT

VIDEO: Gifford's Flowers brings family approach to PSU-area shop.


Read more...

10 quotes explaining crisis at Port of Portland

The Latest
Friday, February 20, 2015
022015 port portland OBM-thumbBY JACOB PALMER | OB DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

The ongoing labor disputes at the Port of Portland came to a head two weeks ago when Hanjin, the container port's largest client, notified its customers it would be ending its direct route to Oregon.


Read more...

Convention Wisdom

February 2015
Monday, January 26, 2015
BY KIM MOORE

After more than a decade of wrangling, construction on a convention center hotel in Portland is slated to start this summer. But debate over project financing continues.


Read more...

Grassroots movement pursues carbon bills

News
Tuesday, February 24, 2015
eventthumbBY KIM MOORE | OB RESEARCH EDITOR

A partnership of a grassroots environmental organization and a youth group is striving to build community and business support for carbon price legislation.


Read more...

The Human Factor

February 2015
Monday, January 26, 2015
BY BRIAN LIBBY

Matt French opens up South Waterfront.


Read more...

5 schools helping students crack code

The Latest
Thursday, January 29, 2015
codeduthumbnailBY JACOB PALMER | OB DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

As the costs of college mount, and as employer demand for software developers soars, coding schools and classes are popping up everywhere.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS