Generation next

| Print |  Email
Articles - April 2012
Thursday, March 22, 2012
BY DAN MCMILLAN
0412_Tactics_01
Third-generation president Jim Patrick is working with his team to ensure the success of Diebold Lumber in Troutdale.
// Photo by Adam Bacher

Diebold Lumber’s president, Jim Patrick, leans forward when Jerry Lawson, his vice president of sales, leaves the room and confides he'd like to see Lawson run the company someday.

The 67-year-old Patrick credits Lawson, 48, with bringing new energy and perspectives to his third-generation lumber company and is willing to trust Lawson and operations manager Dave Smith with his company's future and its hard-earned reputation.

“We've never gone for the cheaper route,” Patrick says. “We've always gone with better.” And he expects the future leaders to continue that tradition.

Lawson returns the compliment by praising Patrick for creating a well-respected business that is positioned to survive into a fourth generation.

Diebold Lumber
President: Jim Patrick
Incorporated: 1940
Employees: 40
Fun fact: Diebold Lumber can process 40 million board feet of lumber per year, enough to build 4,000 1,800-square-foot-houses.

But both know innovation is key in a world where it can be cheaper to ship lumber to China for re-manufacturing than doing the work in the U.S., even when the finished product is destined for the U.S. market.

The foundation of Diebold's reinvention is a lean initiative that provides a way to frame every issue that faces the company: “How do we get more efficiency from the wood we’ve got,” Lawson says.



 

More Articles

Hall of Flame

June 2015
Friday, May 22, 2015
BY JACOB PALMER

A Power Lunch at Oswego Grill.


Read more...

Cherry Raincoat

June 2015
Tuesday, May 26, 2015
BY LINDA BAKER

Spring rains are the bane of an Oregon cherry farmer’s existence. Even a few sprinkles can crack the fruit so badly it’s not worth picking. Science to the rescue: Researchers at Oregon State University have developed a spray-on film that cuts rain-related cracking in half, potentially saving a season’s crop. The coating, patented as SureSeal, is made from natural chemicals similar to those found in the skins of cherries: cellulose, palm oil-based wax and calcium.


Read more...

Fixing Oregon’s broken roads

The Latest
Tuesday, June 09, 2015
RUCCostComparison rev4-30BY KIM MOORE | RESEARCH EDITOR

The technology at the center of Oregon’s road usage fee reform.


Read more...

Sun set

June 2015
Friday, May 22, 2015
BY CHRIS NOBLE

The right sunglasses can protect your eyes and look cool at the same time. This being the 21st century, select shades are socially conscious, too. Portland brand Shwood uses wood and other natural materials and manufactures locally. Founded by Ann Sacks, the brand Fetch dedicates a portion of its profits to animal welfare. But whether you choose classic tortiseshell or aviator chic, please, shed the sunglasses when you walk in the door — and, of course, at night. 


Read more...

100 Best Green Workplaces announced

News
Wednesday, May 27, 2015
OBM-100-best-Green-logo-2015-1000pxwBY LINDA BAKER | EDITOR

More than 250 people turned out today for Oregon Business magazine’s seventh annual celebration of the 100 Best Green Companies to Work For in Oregon.


Read more...

Photo Diary: Forest Grove Farmers Market

The Latest
Thursday, May 14, 2015
IMG 8469BY JASON E. KAPLAN | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

There are more than 160 farmers markets in Oregon, contributing an estimated $50 million in sales, according to the Oregon Farmers Markets Association. We checked in on the Forest Grove market, which for several years has brought local produce and food vendors to Main Street in the center of town.


Read more...

Photo Log: The 2015 100 Best Green Workplaces in Oregon

The Latest
Wednesday, May 27, 2015
greenthumbPHOTOS BY JASON E. KAPLAN

Oregon Business celebrated the 100 Best Green Workplaces with an awards luncheon yesterday at the Nines Hotel in downtown Portland.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS