March 2012
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1 Next: brain clock
2 Powerlist: Meeting facilities
3 100 Best research methodology, category winners and alpha list
4 The 2012 list: top 33 large companies to work for in Oregon
5 The 2012 list: top 34 medium companies to work for in Oregon
6 The 2012 list: top 33 small companies to work for in Oregon
7 The 2012 100 Best Companies by the numbers
8 2012 100 Best Companies best practices
9 Did the recession kill the arts?
10 Mapping peaks and valleys
11 DePaul plans aggressive growth
12 Sibling non-rivalry
13 The market outlier
14 Down on the farm
15 Sarah Mensah balances life, work, play
16 The sales solution
17 The Con-way deal
18 Natural selection
19 Gearing up for hiring
20 The Best for 19 years
21 100 Best Companies to Work For in Oregon 2012 video
 

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The best crisis is the one you avoid

Contributed Blogs
Wednesday, April 15, 2015
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Avoiding a crisis is a great way to burnish your reputation, increase brand loyalty and become a market leader.


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An uncertain future

Guest Blog
Thursday, May 21, 2015
norristhumbBY JASON NORRIS | GUEST BLOGGER

Uncertainty is a part of doing business, whether in through the lens of investment opportunities and risks or the business of running an enterprise.


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Downtime with John Helmick

June 2015
Tuesday, May 26, 2015
BY JACOB PALMER

Live, Work, Play: CEO of Gorilla Capital.


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Green workplace 2.0

Linda Baker
Thursday, May 28, 2015
IMG 2808BY LINDA BAKER | EDITOR

Reinventing capitalism. Office dumpster divers. Handprints versus carbon footprints. These are some of the ideas panelists and attendees discussed during the second annual Oregon Business “Green Your Workplace” seminar yesterday.


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Nine lives

Linda Baker
Friday, May 22, 2015
0f4f7bfBY LINDA BAKER | EDITOR

Roy Kaufmann always lands on his feet.


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Picture This

May 2015
Monday, April 27, 2015
BY JACOB PALMER

As a general rule, the more people with autism can be provided with visual cues, the better they will be able to understand and manage their environment. It’s a lesson Tom Keating learned well. The 61-year-old Eugene grant writer spent 31 years taking care of his autistic brother James, and in the late 1980s developed a spreadsheet that created a series of nonsense characters that grew or shrank depending on how much money James had in his account. 


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European Vacation

Guest Blog
Thursday, April 23, 2015
norristhumbBY JASON NORRIS | GUEST BLOGGER

There are winners and losers with a strengthening U.S. dollar.


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