The Best for 19 years

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Articles - March 2012
Friday, March 02, 2012
Our venerable 100 Best Companies to Work For in Oregon project turned 19 this year. Over the six years that I’ve been the editor of Oregon Business, I have been constantly heartened and amazed at the dedication to the project by Oregon companies, large and small:
  • This year, more than 14,000 employees took the 100 Best survey from 263 companies.
  • The 263 companies that participated employ more than 35,000 Oregon employees.
  • Combined they employ 1.2 million employees worldwide.
  • In the past 10 years, more than 226,000 employee surveys have been completed and more than 1,000 companies have participated.

0312_EditorLetterBut it isn’t just about numbers. This project is about gaining insight into what is important to employees. In this year’s surveys we found that:

  • The most important area to employees was how they were treated by their supervisor and management.
  • The area that gave them most satisfaction was their company’s fairness in racial, age, gender, disability and income differences.
  • The biggest gaps between 100 Best employee satisfaction and what they found important were opportunities for increases in pay and benefits.

After 19 years, it was also time to recognize those companies who have been on the 100 Best list 10 or more times. This year’s inaugural Hall of Fame 100 Best Companies were: Employment Trends, 15 years; Pacific Continental Bank, 13 years; Vernier Software & Technology, 13 years; Umpqua Bank, 13 years; Cascade Employers Association, 12 years; Tec Laboratories, 12 years; David Evans and Associates, 11 years; The Randall Group, 11 years; Pacific Benefit Consultants, 11 years; and Walsh Construction, 10 years.

That’s 121 collective years of commitment by these companies to creating a workplace that treats its employees in the very best possible ways year over year. And there are a dozen more right behind them that have been a 100 Best Company eight or nine times.

If your company doesn’t yet participate, I hope you decide to take the plunge. Next year is the 20th anniversary of the 100 Best project. Wouldn’t it be great to celebrate it together?

 

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