Jan/Feb 2012

Clouds over solar power

| Print |  Email
Articles - Jan/Feb 2012
Thursday, January 19, 2012

0112_Solar_01On the other side of the debate about China’s aggressive push into the U.S. solar market is this: exports.

 

Waves of activity help the tide rise in Newport

| Print |  Email
Articles - Jan/Feb 2012
Thursday, January 19, 2012

0112_Newport_02For small businesses in Newport like Elliott and Daniella Crowder’s Bike Newport, increased activity in marine science has helped boost business in a town traditionally driven by fishing, tourism and logging.

 

John Miller's bottom line

| Print |  Email
Articles - Jan/Feb 2012
Thursday, January 19, 2012

0112_JohnMiller_01John Miller recalls a moment when things clicked into place for him. He was 10, traversing a forest road outside of Stayton with his father, a forester. “On one side, I saw trees he had planted 30 years ago, a healthy forest. On the other side of the road was a stump patch, still there years after the major timber company that owned it had cut the trees and run. That sort of set the tone for me.”

 

The state we're in: business filings

| Print |  Email
Articles - Jan/Feb 2012
Thursday, January 19, 2012
0112_IndicatorsGraph_01The number of new Oregon corporations has fallen since 2005, while new limited liability companies  — Oregon and foreign — peaked in 2007.
 

New course for water ideas

| Print |  Email
Articles - Jan/Feb 2012
Thursday, January 19, 2012

0112_WaterIdeasWater use is an ongoing issue in the state, as farmers, industry, conservationists and governments, particularly in Eastern Oregon, all vie for an increasingly stressed resource.

 

 

Vietnam hungry for Oregon potatoes

| Print |  Email
Articles - Jan/Feb 2012
Thursday, January 19, 2012

0112_Vietnam_01Vietnam’s economy and demand for American exports is growing, and Oregon’s potato growers aren’t being couch potatoes.

 

Chalet RV keeps on rolling

| Print |  Email
Articles - Jan/Feb 2012
Thursday, January 19, 2012

0112_ChaletRVChris Hanson remembers that time back in early 2008 — before the crash — when he thought: “I’ll finally be able to quit my day job.”

 

 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 Next > End >>

Page 1 of 4

More Articles

The short list: Holiday habits of six Oregon CEOs

The Latest
Thursday, December 11, 2014
121214-xmaslist1BY JACOB PALMER | OB DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

We ask business and nonprofit leaders how they survive the season.


Read more...

What I'm Reading

November/December 2014
Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Peter Lizotte at ACME Business Solutions and Roger Busse at Pacific Continental Bank share their favorite reads.


Read more...

Top stories in 2014

The Latest
Thursday, December 18, 2014
10-listthumb

2014 was a year of wild contradictions, fast-paced growth and unexpected revelations.


Read more...

Editor's Letter: Power Play

January-Powerbook 2015
Thursday, December 11, 2014

There’s a fascinating article in the December issue of the Harvard Business Review about a profound power shift taking place in business and society. It’s a long read, but the gist revolves around the tension between “old power” and “new power” as a driver of transformation. Here’s an excerpt:

Old power works like a currency. It is held by few. Once gained, it is jealously guarded, and the powerful have a substantial store of it to spend. It is closed, inaccessible, and leader-driven. It downloads, and it captures.

New power operates differently, like a current. It is made by many. It is open, participatory, and peer-driven. It uploads, and it distributes. Like water or electricity, it’s most forceful when it surges. The goal with new power is not to hoard it but to channel it.

The authors, Henry Timms and Jeremy Heimans, don’t necessarily favor one form of power over another but merely outline how power is transitioning, and how companies can take advantage of these changes to strengthen their positions in the marketplace. 

Our Powerbook issue might be viewed as a case study in the new-power transition. This annual book of lists provides information on leading businesses, nonprofits and universities in the state. Most of the featured companies are entrenched power players now pursuing more flexible and less hierarchical approaches to doing business. Law firms, for example, are adopting new technologies and fee structures to make legal services more accessible and affordable.

This month we also take a look at a controversial new U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission rule requiring public companies to disclose the median pay of workers, as well as the ratio between CEO and median-worker pay. 

Part of the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial reform law, the rule will compel public companies to be more open about employee compensation, with the assumption that greater transparency will improve corporate performance and, perhaps, help address one of the major challenges of our time: income inequality.

New power is not only about strategy and tactics, the Harvard Business Review authors say. “The ultimate questions are ethical. The big question is whether new power can genuinely serve the common good and confront society’s most intractable problems.”

That sounds like a call to arms. Or a New Year’s resolution. Old power or new, the goals are the same: to be a force for positive change in the world. Happy 2015!

— Linda


Read more...

Corner Office: Sheree Arntson

January-Powerbook 2015
Saturday, December 13, 2014

Checking in with the managing director of Arnerich Massena.


Read more...

Shifting Ground

November/December 2014
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
BY JOE ROJAS-BURKE

Bans on genetically modified crops create uncertainty for farmers.


Read more...

Election Season

November/December 2014
Wednesday, October 22, 2014

We didn’t intend this issue to have an election season theme. But politics has a way of seeping into the cracks and fissures.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS