Sponsored by Lane Powell

The evolution of a ranch

| Print |  Email
Articles - Jan/Feb 2012
Thursday, January 19, 2012
0112_EditorLetter
Jeanne Carver and her Imperial Yarn products.
// Photo by Randy Johnson

Over the years that I have been editing Oregon Business, I’ve encountered Jeanne Carver on many occasions, the first being at a rural development convention about five years ago where she spoke passionately about her efforts to develop a fiber business from the historic breed of Columbia sheep on her 140-year-old Imperial Stock Ranch near Maupin.

Since then, I’ve watched Carver work nonstop to build a business on those all-white sheep that were bred by the ranch’s founder, Richard Hinton. A few years ago, I attended the runway debut of clothes made from her wool, and since then have been getting regular updates in her e-newsletter about ranch life and the yarn operation.

After years of seeing Carver in action, I thought it was time to take a more holistic look at how she and her husband, Dan, and their family make the economy on their historic ranch work. Their story is also the story of how many family ranches in Oregon — and in the nation — are finding ways to evolve their operations in order to survive.

There was a steady drip of news late last year that an Oregon company had been sold: Rejuvenation, McCormick & Schmick’s, Kettleman Bagel Co. They piled on top of other high-profile outright buyouts or majority stake sells such as Stumptown Coffee, YoCream, Dagoba Chocolate, Jeld-Wen and Harry & David.

Was this good news? Bad news? As always, the reality is not so black and white, as managing editor Linda Baker discovered in her cover story. We like to keep our managing editor busy around here, so in the March issue Baker will start a new feature that focuses on the considerable startup business activity in the state. Also, check out her new weekly blog.

We’ve also revamped our e-newsletter, adding more news links and original stories and perking up the design. It's informative and it’s free. (Go to OregonBusiness.com/enewsletter to sign up.) No big buyout dreams here.

Robin Doussard

 

 

More Articles

The ancient fish that stops bullets

The Latest
Friday, May 08, 2015
hagfishthumbBY CHRIS NOBLE | PHOTOS BY JASON E. KAPLAN

Hagfish may not have evolved much over the last 300 million years, but their protein-heavy slime promises advances in super-materials.


Read more...

The Backstory: Portland Youth Builders

The Latest
Wednesday, June 03, 2015
blog002 1BY JASON E. KAPLAN | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

As part of our green workplaces story, Oregon Business checked out a community service project undertaken by Portland Youth Builders, a nonprofit alternative high school. In partnership with Whole Foods, PYB built garden boxes for a Home Forward  housing site. Home Forward is a government agency that provides housing for low income residents and people with disabilities.


Read more...

Modern design defines new Portland indoor market

The Latest
Thursday, June 25, 2015
thumbSnøhetta JBPM exterior www mir noBY KIM MOORE | RESEARCH EDITOR

An international architecture firm known for its design of the National September 11 Memorial Museum Pavilion in New York unveiled its plan this week for a modern indoor/outdoor food market at the foot of the Morrison Bridge in downtown Portland.


Read more...

Photo Diary: Forest Grove Farmers Market

The Latest
Thursday, May 14, 2015
IMG 8469BY JASON E. KAPLAN | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

There are more than 160 farmers markets in Oregon, contributing an estimated $50 million in sales, according to the Oregon Farmers Markets Association. We checked in on the Forest Grove market, which for several years has brought local produce and food vendors to Main Street in the center of town.


Read more...

Downtime with John Helmick

June 2015
Tuesday, May 26, 2015
BY JACOB PALMER

Live, Work, Play: CEO of Gorilla Capital.


Read more...

Fixing Oregon’s broken roads

The Latest
Tuesday, June 09, 2015
RUCCostComparison rev4-30BY KIM MOORE | RESEARCH EDITOR

The technology at the center of Oregon’s road usage fee reform.


Read more...

Cherry Raincoat

June 2015
Tuesday, May 26, 2015
BY LINDA BAKER

Spring rains are the bane of an Oregon cherry farmer’s existence. Even a few sprinkles can crack the fruit so badly it’s not worth picking. Science to the rescue: Researchers at Oregon State University have developed a spray-on film that cuts rain-related cracking in half, potentially saving a season’s crop. The coating, patented as SureSeal, is made from natural chemicals similar to those found in the skins of cherries: cellulose, palm oil-based wax and calcium.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS