Waves of activity help the tide rise in Newport

| Print |  Email
Articles - Jan/Feb 2012
Thursday, January 19, 2012

 

0112_Newport_02
NOAA’s new Pacific Marine Operations Center in Newport (shown here) could attract more than $17 million in new research grants to institutions such as the Hatfield Marine Science Center.

In addition, the grant is just one of many research projects under way in Newport, many of which require charter boat services, housing for researchers and other local services. Hatfield also partners with eight state and federal agencies involved with marine research, five different colleges at OSU and the Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center.

“Marine research really has a potential to be a growing industry and to become one of the drivers here,” says Caroline Bauman, executive director of the Economic Development Alliance of Lincoln County.

Bauman is among a group of government officials, industry representatives and scientists behind the Yaquina Bay Ocean Observing Initiative, which aims to pursue economic development opportunities related to ocean-observing activities. Those include not only research, but also wave energy development, commercial fishing, seafood processing and other similar fields.

The effort toward capitalizing on Newport’s research endeavors melds nicely with some of the other ocean-based activities that have been on the upswing over the past year or so. The Port of Newport, which is the landlord for both Hatfield and the new NOAA facility, has seen a nice uptick in activity with the arrival of NOAA’s fleet. The ships are out at sea for much of the spring and summer months, but when they are in port, NOAA employees are utilizing local repair and supply services, including those at a newly renovated boatyard upriver in Toledo, frequenting local shops and restaurants and living in the city.

“We have five large vessels tied to the pier right now and gearing up for fisheries and weather research in the spring all up and down the West Coast,” says Don Mann, general manager of the port. “That’s activity that we haven’t had before and that will be an ongoing contribution to the entire region.”

The port is also one of the three largest on the Oregon Coast and is a major player in both the Oregon and Pacific fishing industry. Between 70 and 100 fishing boats pass through the port each month, and in 2010, according to Mann, Newport landed 57 million pounds of fish, ranking it No. 20 in the nation in terms of total pounds landed. The value of its annual haul that year was $30.6 million, plus an additional $32 million from the distant water fleet, which comprises vessels that fish in other waters, including Alaska.

“They make that trip twice a year, but many of them have their homes here,” Mann says, “so most of their money comes back here.”

The port is also in the middle of a multi-million dollar project to rebuild its international terminal, which could lead to increased opportunities for exporting and importing logs and other cargo, something the port hasn’t seen in more than a decade.

“We’re looking forward to the growth in marine science research,” Mann says, “but we’ve also seen a significant increase in interest in cargo, so hopefully by this time next year, [the terminal] be back in business.”



 

More Articles

Flattery with Numbers

July/August 2015
Friday, July 10, 2015
BY JOE CORTRIGHT

The false promise of economic impact statements.


Read more...

Photo log: Murray's Pharmacy

The Latest
Friday, July 17, 2015
OBM-Heppner-Kaplan thumbBY JASON KAPLAN

Photographer Jason Kaplan takes a look at Murray's Pharmacy in Heppner.  The family owned business is run by John and Ann Murray, who were featured in our July/August cover story: 10 Innovators in Rural Health Care.


Read more...

Reader Input: Energy Overload

June 2015
Wednesday, July 15, 2015

We asked readers to weigh in on the fossil fuel-green energy equation.


Read more...

Farm in a Box

July/August 2015
Friday, July 10, 2015
BY JACOB PALMER

Most of the food Americans consume is trucked in from hundreds of miles away. Eric Wilson, co-founder and CEO of Gro-volution, wants to change that. So this past spring, the Air Force veteran and former greenhouse manager started work on an alternative farming system he claims is more efficient than conventional agriculture, and also shortens the distance between the consumer and the farm.


Read more...

Department of Self-Promotion

Linda Baker
Wednesday, June 17, 2015

061715-awards1Oregon Business wins journalism awards.


Read more...

Marijuana law ushers in new business age

The Latest
Tuesday, June 23, 2015
062315panelthumbBY KIM MOORE | RESEARCH EDITOR

Oregon’s new marijuana law is expected to lead to a bevy of new business opportunities for the state. And not just for growers. Law firms, HR consultants, energy efficiency companies and many others are expected to benefit from the decriminalization of pot, according to panelists at an Oregon Business breakfast meeting on Tuesday.


Read more...

10 Innovators in Rural Health

July/August 2015
Monday, July 13, 2015
BY AMY MILSHTEIN | PHOTOS BY JASON E. KAPLAN

Telemedicine, new partnerships and real estate diversification make health care more accessible in rural Oregon.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS