Mac's List of job postings grows

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Articles - December 2011
Tuesday, November 15, 2011
1211_MacsList_02
Mac Prichard plans to double Mac’s List revenues in a year.
// Photo by Alexandra Shyshkina

According to a recent survey of Mac’s List subscribers, about 20% reside outside of Oregon, but find the list to be a more accurate reflection of the employment scene here than large national jobsboards, such as Monster.com.

“I think hyperlocal is the way everything’s going,” says Hammill. “A lot of big sites don’t do a very good job of that, even when they try. Something like what we’re doing is local from the ground up.”

Prichard’s extensive resume includes stints in city and state government (communications director for Earl Blumenauer’s 1992 run for mayor and speechwriter for Gov. John Kitzhaber during his first term as governor), and work for social agencies and philanthropies. He says Mac’s List grew out of his desire to stay in touch with former colleagues in Salem and Portland and to provide helpful information. As was the case in 2001 when he first started emailing job postings to friends, Mac’s List is a reflection of Prichard’s own areas of interest and expertise.

“Our niche has evolved,” he says. “Originally it was largely communications, but our listings for the past year show we’re heavily represented in the nonprofit, Oregon foundation and public agency sectors. That’s where our relationships are.”

The list, informally known as Mac’s List since its inception, became a weekly newsletter in October 2008. “It went viral,” says Prichard. Subscribers numbered about 100 at the beginning. Three years later there are 8,500 subscribers, with the addition of about 45 to 75 new subscribers every week.

In October 2010 Mac’s List went from being a completely free service to charging employers for job postings, just to recover costs. In a year, paid listings went from six to more than 70. The price of a 30-day job listing ranges from $49 for a small nonprofit to $199 for a for-profit business. Those rates are nearly half the prices charged by some national job boards.

Prichard says people often approach him to thank him personally for a great job found on Mac’s List. Sam Chase, Nick Fish’s former chief-of-staff, was one. “It is a great service,” commented Chase, who found on Mac’s List his current job directing the Coalition of Community Health Clinics.

The steady growth of Mac’s List has Prichard confident that the goal of doubling Mac’s List revenues in a year will be met.

“But it’s also about karma,” he says. “I really do enjoy helping people and always have. The more information I share and the more I give, the more I get back.”



 

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