Home Back Issues November 2011 Dig it: behind the numbers

Dig it: behind the numbers

| Print |  Email
Articles - November 2011
Wednesday, October 19, 2011

Research editor Brandon Sawyer has applied his considerable research and number-crunching abilities to producing many features for Oregon Business: the data-rich Indicators and Databursts, along with our myriad lists such as the Private 150, a list of the biggest private companies in Oregon.

1111_EditorLetter
Brandon Sawyer has been digging for data for 10 years as the research editor of Oregon Business. 
// Photo by Alexandra Shyshkina

He also is the maestro of our three 100 Best research projects. Chief among those, the 100 Best Companies to Work For in Oregon project this year was named the No. 1 research project in the region by the American Society of Business Publication Editors in no small part because of Brandon’s tremen- dous skills. He’s been the research editor for the magazine for a decade, and brings a detailed knowledge of the state to his work along with an understanding of where the numbers are kept.

Building on that knowledge, Brandon launches in this issue Data Dig, an occasional series that looks underneath the hood of various business and economic topics. This month’s installment started out with a simple question about whether people follow jobs as we looked at conflicting population and employment numbers being released. Turns out, sometimes they do, and sometimes they don’t, and it’s not a simple answer. That’s what Data Dig will do: find out what’s really going on behind the numbers, which can be so numbing, and put them into context.

The wealth of data that Brandon produced for this Data Dig couldn’t all fit in the print magazine (research editors can go wild), so we’ve posted more regional job and population analysis and charts on our website at OregonBusiness.com/population. Check it out. It’s a great snapshot of how the regions differ.

The cover story by managing editor Linda Baker also came about because of another simple question: How many women sit on boards in Oregon? Just doing the math is often the most powerful flashlight we have.

robin-BLOGRobin Doussard
 

More Articles

Oversight? Or gaming the system?

News
Monday, July 14, 2014
AmazonBY VIVIAN MCINERNY | OB BLOGGER

Some people think Amazon’s winking eye logo is starting to look like a hoodwink.


Read more...

Why I became an Oregon angel investor

Guest Blog
Monday, July 14, 2014
AngelInvestBY TERRY "STARBUCKER" ST. MARIE

I really didn’t know that much about angel investing, but I did know a lot about the entrepreneurial spirit.


Read more...

Q&A: David Lively of Organically Grown Co.

News
Tuesday, July 01, 2014
OGCLogoBY HANNAH WALLACE | OB BLOGGER

Demand for organic food continues to soar: Last year, sales of organic food rose to $32.3 billion — up 10% from 2012. In Oregon, organic produce wholesaler Organically Grown Co. has been championing organic growing methods for four decades.


Read more...

Who said we should sell in May?

Contributed Blogs
Friday, July 18, 2014
BullMarketBY JASON NORRIS | OB GUEST CONTRIBUTOR

Back in May, we shared a common Wall Street quote about investing, “Sell in May and go away.” Fast forward to July and the most common question we have been getting from clients is, “When is the market pullback going to occur?”


Read more...

Charged ride

June 2014
Thursday, May 29, 2014
0614launchBY JESSICA RIDGWAY

Brad Baker, CEO and co-founder of Works Electric, is a good husband. His wife, an OHSU employee, sought a more efficient way to commute up Marquam “Pill” Hill, so she asked Baker to build a transportation solution.


Read more...

South Waterfront's revenge

News
Thursday, July 24, 2014
MoodyAveBY LINDA BAKER | OB EDITOR

Remember the naysayers?  Those who called the South Waterfront aerial tram a boondoggle?  Those who rejoiced at the massive sell off of luxury condos at the John Ross and Atwater Place?


Read more...

Risks & rewards of owning triple net investments

Contributed Blogs
Thursday, July 24, 2014
NNNinvestmentBY CLIFF HOCKLEY | OB GUEST CONTRIBUTOR

With the increasing retirements of Baby Boomers, a massive real estate shift has created a significant increase in demand for NNN properties. The result? Increased demand has triggered higher prices and lower yields.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS