Home Back Issues November 2011 Barhyte Specialty Foods' success

Barhyte Specialty Foods' success

| Print |  Email
Articles - November 2011
Wednesday, October 19, 2011
Article Index
Barhyte Specialty Foods' success
Page 2
1111_Tactics_03
// Photos by Adam Bacher
1111_Tactics_04
The breakthrough came in 1999, when Barhyte received a call from a representative of Kroger, one of the largest grocery chains in the world, which had just executed a merger with Fred Meyer. The company wanted to start selling condiments under an upscale private label, and they wanted Barhyte to make it for them. The Barhytes recognized the opportunity, and after passing the necessary inspections and tests they began ramping up production in Pendleton. They produced 10 mustards for Kroger, as well as salad dressings, chicken wing sauces and other condiments. The deal with Kroger brought others like it, and today 80% of the family business is in private labels.

In 2006, Barhyte Specialty Foods won an award as grocery vendor of year for the Kroger chain. Chris and Suzie attended the event where they were honored, and the positive feedback they received there compelled them to make their largest investment — an overhaul of Suzie’s test kitchen and expansions of the production facility and warehouses. They followed up that initiative with marketing campaigns to solidify the brand around the family name and Suzie’s cooking, obtaining a trademark for the phrase “Make every meal extraordinary,” and launching a line of marinades, dressings and mustards under the label Saucy Mama. Their newest item, Suzie’s Yellow Mustard, came out in October.

The business didn’t suffer during the recession partly because Barhyte doesn’t sell to many restaurants, and didn’t get hurt when people shifted from dining out to dining at home to save money. The company is on track to improve on its 2010 sales figure. Barhyte says sales have increased every year since the company raked in $145,000 in 1995. He gets a kick out of the monthly pitch calls from the bank that used to turn them down for loans, and from the steady flow of offers to buy the company. He says he plans to continue ignoring those offers to sell.




 

Comments   

 
Travel Pendleton
0 #1 So Proud!Travel Pendleton 2011-10-28 11:58:58
Pendleton is so proud of Barhyte's success and their desire to keep production here! Their facility is beautiful with one of the best views overlooking our valley.
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
Guest
0 #2 barhyteGuest 2012-12-29 09:13:19
just wanted to say..Im a Barhyte from Wisconsin
Quote | Report to administrator
 

More Articles

The Alchemist

September 2014
Tuesday, August 26, 2014
BY LINDA BAKER

David Howitt explains why Portland consumer brands like Stumptown and Voodoo Doughnuts are taking the world by storm.


Read more...

Downtime

September 2014
Wednesday, August 27, 2014
BY JESSICA RIDGWAY

How State Representative Julie Parrish (House District 37) balances life between work and play.


Read more...

The Diaspora

October 2014
Thursday, September 25, 2014
BY LEE VAN DER VOO

Former newspaper journalists move into brand journalism.


Read more...

True Blood

October 2014
Thursday, September 25, 2014
BY JOE ROJAS-BURKE

Antibiotics really aren’t magic bullets.


Read more...

Powerlist: Law Firms

October 2014
Thursday, September 25, 2014
BY KIM MOORE

A conversation with leading partners at law firms in Portland and eastern Oregon, followed by October's powerlist.


Read more...

A Recipe for Success

October 2014
Thursday, September 25, 2014
BY LINDA BAKER

Two businesswomen, two iconic food brands and one food-obsessed city. We thought this sounded like a recipe for good conversation. So in late August, Oregon Business sat down with Wendy Collie, CEO of New Seasons Market, and Kim Malek, owner of Salt & Straw, to discuss their rapidly expanding businesses and Oregon’s trendsetting food scene.


Read more...

Constant Contact

October 2014
Thursday, September 25, 2014
BY AMY MILSHTEIN

To prevent burnout, companies are banning email and after-hours communications. But is the 24-hour workday here to stay?


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS