Home Back Issues November 2011 Better birth control

Better birth control

| Print |  Email
Articles - November 2011
Wednesday, October 19, 2011

By Linda Baker

1111_NextBirth control methods typically work in one of two ways. The first is via physical obstruction, such as the diaphragm or condom. The second is through manipulation of biological systems, such as “The Pill.” Now researchers at OHSU’s Oregon Natural Primate Research Center are developing a new female contraceptive that combines the mechanical operations of the former with the biological advances of the latter. The technique, which inhibits enzymes responsible for the release of an egg, is low impact and more foolproof, says ONPRC scientist Jon Hennebold. “Think of enzymes as the molecular scissors that cut the proteins that make up the structure of the follicle,” he says. Neutralize that process with a drug, and the egg stays in the follicle, preventing fertilization. Hormonal forms of birth control such as the pill involve daily medication and health risks such as cardiovascular disease. But the new method, which zeroes in on a specific physical target — the follicle —doesn’t require such stringent regimens and has fewer health impacts, says Hennebold, adding that the long-term research goal is to develop an oral delivery system. And where does the “oocyte” that is never released go? Not to worry, says Hennebold. “The egg is eventually consumed by the ovary itself.”

 

More Articles

Who said we should sell in May?

Contributed Blogs
Friday, July 18, 2014
BullMarketBY JASON NORRIS | OB GUEST CONTRIBUTOR

Back in May, we shared a common Wall Street quote about investing, “Sell in May and go away.” Fast forward to July and the most common question we have been getting from clients is, “When is the market pullback going to occur?”


Read more...

Updated: Disrupting innovation

News
Tuesday, July 08, 2014
070814 thumb disputive-innovationBY LINDA BAKER  | OB EDITOR

The New Yorker recently published a sharply worded critique of “disruptive innovation,” one of the most widely cited theories in the business world today. The article raises questions about the descriptive value of disruption and innovation  — whether the terms are mere buzzwords or actually explain today's extraordinarily complex and fast changing business environment. 

Update: We caught up with Portland's Thomas Thurston, who shared his data driven take on the disruption controversy.


Read more...

Two sides of the coin

Contributed Blogs
Monday, August 25, 2014
0825 thumb moneyBY JASON NORRIS | OB GUEST BLOGGER

Ferguson Wellman’s investment views on the economy and capital markets.


Read more...

South Waterfront's revenge

News
Thursday, July 24, 2014
MoodyAveBY LINDA BAKER | OB EDITOR

Remember the naysayers?  Those who called the South Waterfront aerial tram a boondoggle?  Those who rejoiced at the massive sell off of luxury condos at the John Ross and Atwater Place?


Read more...

Green Endeavor cleans up

News
Wednesday, August 06, 2014
080614 ULnew greenendeavorBY LINDA BAKER | OB EDITOR

Portland startup Green Endeavor strikes gold, inking a partnership with Underwriters Laboratories, an Illinois-based consulting and certification company with offices in 46 countries.


Read more...

Community colleges and sustainability

Contributed Blogs
Thursday, July 31, 2014
sustainabilityBY MARY SPILDE | OB GUEST CONTRIBUTOR

Faced with the aftermath of the “great recession,” increasing concern about the environment and dwindling family wage jobs, we have some very important choices to make about our future.


Read more...

Oversight? Or gaming the system?

News
Monday, July 14, 2014
AmazonBY VIVIAN MCINERNY | OB BLOGGER

Some people think Amazon’s winking eye logo is starting to look like a hoodwink.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS