Ashland's new age economy

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Articles - September 2011
Wednesday, August 24, 2011

 

0911_HarmonicConvergence_10
Zimmerman’s store, Web-sters, includes goods made from the wool from sheep raised on her family ranch in its colorful inventory.
// Photo by Jamie Lusch

Just as they have embraced technology as a way to propel their businesses, these New Age entrepreneurs have no problem talking about money. Until TimeBank concepts are ubiquitous, money is the accepted currency in the current age. The New Age entrepreneurs have got to pay the bills in this lifetime.

“We have thousands of clients here at Hidden Springs, people who feel like they belong,” says Wilkinson about the center, which was founded a decade ago. The graceful complex lies behind a fence overlooking a garden and spring-fed pond. The practitioners offer yoga, life counseling, fitness coaching, spa services, communications consulting, cleansing, spiritual guidance. Wilkinson, the fitness director for Hidden Springs, also makes his living as a ghost writer, communications consultant and life coach.

“People are willing to spend money to be treated with respect, and we show them that respect,” he says. “The bottom line speaks: We’re profitable, we’re doing our thing, and people are spending money on it.”

The need for financial security and the desire to settle permanently in Ashland motivated Yogi Tunes’ King-Harris to create a business plan, attract investors and launch the business in July. “My partners and I have done a lot of hard work, building our contacts in the yoga industry,” says King-Harris.

For years, he says, they wrote music, toured to support music sales, spent days in the studio recording their songs. Now, he wants to spend more time with his family in Ashland. “We are looking to live a good life, not one where we’re traveling all the time and spending days in the studio. To do that, we need money. What we have is a business model, with investors, not some pie-in-the-sky dream.”

As more of these New Age entrepreneurs find each other in Ashland, the economic ties that bind them to one another grow stronger. Several of them are already planning to hire EcoNest to advise them on new home construction. And back at Jackson Wellsprings, several partners are already in discussions about joining forces to launch a new spiritually inspired commercial project.

Asha Deliverance has proposed to the Wellsprings’ Gerry Lehrburger and Goddess Temple co-founder Graell Corsini that they build a geodesic dome village at the Wellsprings. Lehrburger would provide the land; Corsini’s priestesses could be the first residents of the domes; and Deliverance would have a demonstration model of what an all-dome village might look like elsewhere, thus spurring her dome sales. It’s the Ashland spiritual/economic network at its harmonic best, looking for yet another way to make ends meet in this lifetime while preparing for the next.



 

Comments   

 
Guest
0 #1 dr. of integrative healthGuest 2012-12-06 00:42:43
Asha:
have written you an e-mail.
after reading about you it is quite apparent that you have very little if any time to respond.
thinking seriously of relocating to ashland to practice.
will visit in jan to look around and feel if it is a good fit.
sounds like the area is certainly on the same eco friendly path that we are.
if you would be so kind as to let us know how to contact you with our visit info.
we would very much like to visit with you at your convenience for whatever you time you may be able to spare.
thank you
dr. phil and deborah goodman
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