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Ashland's new age economy

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Articles - September 2011
Wednesday, August 24, 2011


A client receives a treatment at the Hidden Springs Wellness Center.
// Photo by Jamie Lusch

Deliverance, another iconic Ashland figure, also relocated to Ashland, but much earlier. She left Santa Cruz, Calif., for Ashland three decades ago, founding Pacific Domes in 1980 “because I needed a way to make money.” She had sewn teepees previously and was attracted to the alternative dwelling business. Ashland felt spiritually welcoming to her, so she stayed. Now she’s become something of a spiritual networker around town.

“We have a network of save-the-world people here in Ashland, and more are coming,” says Deliverance. “We are the transition earth people. We are leading the way into a better future.”

Many of the entrepreneurs new to town would do well to study Pacific Domes’ strategy. Deliverance believes in philanthropy and is quick to respond to requests for emergency shelters — or Goddess Temples. But she tempers her charitable tendencies by keeping an eye on the bottom line.

“Bridging the two worlds of spirit and materialism is challenging,” says Deliverance. “I coach my sales team to be honest and direct, to sell domes, to collect payments and to abide by the contract.”

When the recession hit, Pacific Domes suffered just like everyone else, she says. The company had revenue of $4 million-plus in 2008, employed about 40 people and was experiencing double-digit annual growth before the recession. The global financial crisis hit Pacific Domes hard. Sales today are about $2 million, and employment about half of what it was. She says sales are now up again.



0 #1 dr. of integrative healthGuest 2012-12-06 00:42:43
have written you an e-mail.
after reading about you it is quite apparent that you have very little if any time to respond.
thinking seriously of relocating to ashland to practice.
will visit in jan to look around and feel if it is a good fit.
sounds like the area is certainly on the same eco friendly path that we are.
if you would be so kind as to let us know how to contact you with our visit info.
we would very much like to visit with you at your convenience for whatever you time you may be able to spare.
thank you
dr. phil and deborah goodman
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