Sock It to Me's success

| Print |  Email
Articles - August 2011
Wednesday, July 20, 2011

By Ben Jacklet

 

0811_Tactics_01
Photos by Juan-Carlos Delgado
0811_Tactics_02

Carrie Atkinson was 26 and frustrated with the lack of job opportunities in Portland when she decided to start her own company selling fun, colorful socks. She found an importer by looking through the phone book (that’s right, the phone book), traveled to Korea with two big suitcases and filled them with her first 2,000 pairs of socks.

Now Atkinson is 32 and running a well-known business that grew by 90% in 2010. She’s got 6,000 Facebook fans, a far-flung team of creative designers, a solid group of wholesale customers, a growing portfolio of fashion photos in magazines and container after container of socks flowing from Korea to meet demand. She’s considering delving into a line of men’s socks in collaboration with Portland entrepreneur Nitin Khanna and making plans to delve into lingerie after making friends with a woman who runs a manufacturing plant in China.

Sock It to Me is known for its “cool girl” promotions and its fresh, bold styles that are “a little crazier than the other stuff out there,” in Atkinson’s words. But Atkinson’s approach has been far from crazy. She didn’t buy more socks until it was clear her first batch was selling at the Portland Saturday Market. She saved her pennies until she could afford a booth in the big Las Vegas apparel trade show, Magic. She got a $250,000 bank loan on her home and built up her credit for six years before taking out a second loan. She is not indebted to venture capitalists or angel investors. She owns 100% of the company.

“I felt like I was led by the customer, which is a little less risky in my eyes,” she says. “I never got too far ahead of the customers.”

Not only does Atkinson encourage her customers to lead the company, she also encourages them to design her socks. A few years ago she began running full-page ads in the Portland Mercury and Willamette Week that doubled as design-a-sock contest entries, to be colored in by local artists. Contest winners get $500 and the cachet of seeing their art turned into a commercial product. Non-winners with ideas good enough to go to design get $200.

“It was just an idea that made sense to me,” says Atkinson. Sock It to Me has found some of its top designers in this manner, and the local — and now international — contests bring in thousands of new design ideas while also building name recognition. Atkinson estimates that about 80% of the business’s design lines come from crowd sourcing. The most recent contest drew 2,500 submissions; winners come from Sweden, Britain and El Salvador.

The customer designs lead directly to new products. “We get those designs through the contests, we tweak them, we assign the colors and we email that image over to Korea,” says Atkinson. “I have a business partner there and he negotiates with the factory. He is our quality control and he gets all the shipping documents prepared, and he gets a commission per pair.”

 



 

Comments   

 
Guest
-1 #1 i want to start a sock lineGuest 2013-07-10 16:22:37
Hi, can you please give me some steps to get started?
Quote | Report to administrator
 

More Articles

Bike Chic: 7 stylish options for cyclists

April 2015
Thursday, March 26, 2015

Cycling to work is all the rage. But not everyone wants to arrive at the office messy, sweaty — and unfashionable.


Read more...

City announces plans for Portland summer-league baseball team

News
Tuesday, March 10, 2015
IMG 3888BY JACOB PALMER | OB DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

Baseball is returning to Portland and city officials are hoping economic opportunity comes with it.


Read more...

European Vacation

Guest Blog
Thursday, April 23, 2015
norristhumbBY JASON NORRIS | GUEST BLOGGER

There are winners and losers with a strengthening U.S. dollar.


Read more...

6 development projects reshaping Bend

The Latest
Thursday, April 09, 2015
bendthumbBY JACOB PALMER | DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

Bend has reclaimed its prerecession title as one of the fastest growing cities in the country.


Read more...

Can small be large?

Linda Baker
Wednesday, April 01, 2015
040115-lindablogthumbBY LINDA BAKER

Leaders in Oregon's ag sector gathered this morning in Portland’s Coopers Hall winery/taproom to discuss the role of the region as an export gateway, impediments to exporting products and solutions to containerized shipping challenges.


Read more...

Meeting Facilities Perspective

March 2015
Tuesday, February 24, 2015
BY KIM MOORE | OB RESEARCH EDITOR

A conversation with Donna Earley, director of sales and marketing for the Salem Convention Center.


Read more...

100 Best: The Power of the Worker

March 2015
Wednesday, February 25, 2015
BY KIM MOORE | OB RESEARCH EDITOR
AND AMY MILSHTEIN | OB CONTRIBUTOR

Technology is empowering people like never before and transforming how employees interact in the workplace. How can companies attract and keep staff engaged in this rapidly changing world?


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS