Cell phone law loophole closed

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Articles - August 2011
Wednesday, July 20, 2011

By Ben Jacklet

0811_PutDownThePhoneA loophole large enough to drive your truck through while jabbering on your cell phone has been nailed shut.

Oregon’s original 2009 mobile phone law banned texting and/or talking into a hand-held device while driving. But the law exempted all business-related calls, thus rendering it practically unenforceable, not to mention silly, given how simple it is to install and use a hands-free device in your car. The updated law ends the exception for job-related conversations, while continuing to exempt calls made by police officers and emergency teams.

Calls made by agricultural workers are also still exempt for some reason, so people determined to continue jabbering as always might want to keep some farming tools in the trunk just in case.

The law will take effect in January 2012. The fine for violators is $142.

 

Comments   

 
Steve Crawford
+1 #1 Thank goodness for that Anti Texting lawSteve Crawford 2011-08-24 11:15:29
It leaves me more time to read the paper on the way to work. And now I'll get a Medical Marijuana card so I can grow pot in my trunk in case I have an uncontrollable sexting urge and need an agricultural alibi.
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Bob Brown
0 #2 Why do we pass unenforceable laws?Bob Brown 2011-08-25 13:15:08
I see this law being violated many times every day, which raises two questions:

1. If it can't be enforced, and obviously it can't be, why was it adopted?

2. It's actually a good idea, to NOT talk on a cell phone while driving, as most people aren't able to do so and maintain attention to their driving. As mentioned in the article, it is simple to use a hands free device. So, the second question is, why don't people obey the law and also common sense, which is that you'll be safer if you don't use your cell phone while driving.
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