Barre3 grows with revival of group fitness classes

| Print |  Email
Articles - August 2011
Wednesday, July 20, 2011
By Lucy Burningham

 

0811_HeadingToTheBarreTogether_01
Sadie Lincoln is the founder of Barre3, a fitness studio built around ballet barre exercise. The company has sold 22 franchises since it opened its first location in Southeast Portland in 2008. // Photos by Teresa Meier
0811_HeadingToTheBarreTogether_02
0811_HeadingToTheBarreTogether_04

For decades, people have been sweating and stretching as an instructor leads the way (think Jazzercise, step aerobics or Jane Fonda). As long as misery loves company, it seemed group fitness classes would endure. But in the past few years — since the recession — group classes have become even more in vogue, a trend that’s buoyed a Portland-based startup.

Barre3, a fitness studio that offers hour-long classes structured around the same kind of “barre” ballet dancers use, opened its first location in Southeast Portland in 2008. Since then the company has sold 22 franchises, four of which are in the Philippines. A franchise costs $30,000, and the average studio employs 20 part-timers, and one to two full-time workers, including the owner.

Founder and instructor Sadie Lincoln, who launched the company with her husband, Chris Lincoln, says she didn’t anticipate such rapid growth, fueled in part by glowing media coverage in high-circulation publications including Marie Claire, Shape and US Weekly. (US Weekly revealed that Madonna was using the Barre3 method to stay in shape.) Not only did the coverage attract new franchisees, but it also propelled sales of Lincoln’s DVD based on the studio’s workout techniques — an extra she originally created for clients who weren’t able to make it to the studio.

Lincoln, a native of Eugene, says she wrote the business plan for Barre3 based on a shift in consumer preferences she observed during the 10 years she was employed at 24 Hour Fitness. “Gyms became ginormous and less intimate, which created a cultural change,” says Lincoln. “Just like people wanted to buy local, they wanted to work out local.”

Beyond the drive to support the indie business owner, fitness-minded consumers longed to exercise in a small setting, she says, which fosters a sense of community. “Especially since the recession, people want the connection group classes provide,” Lincoln says.

The International Health, Racquet and Sportsclub Association, an international fitness industry trade group, supports her theory. Based on polling of its 9,000 members, the number of socially based exercise classes, both in and outside gyms, has increased since 2008, especially when it comes to cardio-kickboxing, yoga, high-impact aerobics, dance-style classes and strength-training classes.

The group also reports an increase in “fusion” classes that combine exercise, yoga, Pilates and dance — precisely the Barre3 mash-up. While Lincoln admits barre work is trendy right now, she says the franchise’s unique sequencing of moves keeps clients faithful to the studios.

While she won’t reveal how many new franchises are in the works, Lincoln hopes the Barre3 buzz combined with the drive to work out in groups means even more people will join Madonna in this specific quest for a fit body.

 

Comments   

 
Abe
-7 #1 Another reasonAbe 2011-08-26 16:45:08
I think deeper investigation into the reason for the growth in Group programs would reveal that we have more graduates from school systems where Socialist Kool Aid was dispensed on a daily basis.
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
Guest
0 #2 wearable technologiesGuest 2015-06-19 08:41:46
I love reading a post that can make people think. Also, thank you for allowing for me to comment!
Quote | Report to administrator
 

More Articles

Aim High

September 2015
Thursday, August 20, 2015
BY JOE CORTRIGHT

We get the education we deserve.


Read more...

Reader Input: Fair Play

May 2015
Wednesday, July 15, 2015

Former Governor John Kitzhaber's resignation in February prompted some soul searching in this state about ethical behavior in industry and government.


Read more...

Big Trouble in China?

Guest Blog
Tuesday, August 18, 2015
0818-wellmanthumbBY JASON NORRIS | CFA

Earlier this month, the People’s Bank of China (PBoC) announced they were going to devalue their currency, the Renminbi. While the amount of the targeted change was to be roughly 2 percent, investors read a lot more into the move. The Renminbi had been gradually appreciating against the U.S. dollar (see chart) as to attempt to alleviate concerns of being labeled a currency manipulator.


Read more...

Light Reading

September 2015
Thursday, August 20, 2015
BY JACOB PALMER

Ask any college student: Textbook prices have skyrocketed out of control. Online education startup Lumen Learning aims to bring them down to earth.


Read more...

Staffing Challenge

July/August 2015
Monday, July 13, 2015
BY KIM MOORE

A conversation with Greg Lambert, president of Mid Oregon Personnel Services.


Read more...

Photo Log: Waterfront Blues Festival

The Latest
Thursday, July 09, 2015
bluesfestthumbBY JASON E. KAPLAN | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

The sweltering weather didn't keep the crowds away. Although the numbers were down slightly from last year, the Oregon Food Bank raised $850,636 to fight hunger.  About 80,000 people attended despite temperatures in the upper 90s.


Read more...

Back to School

September 2015
Wednesday, August 19, 2015
BY CHRIS NOBLE

Oregon is home to an abundance of gritty warehouses reborn as trendy office spaces, as well as crafty hipsters turned entrepreneurs. Does the combination yield an equally bounteous office products sector? Not so much. Occupying the limited desk jockey space are Field Notes, a spinoff of Portland’s Draplin Design Company, and Schuttenworks, known for whittling Apple device stands. For a full complement of keyboard trays, docking stations and mouse pads, check out the GroveMade line, guaranteed to boost the cachet of even the lowliest cubicle drone. 


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS