Home Back Issues August 2011 Independent pharmacies struggle

Independent pharmacies struggle

| Print |  Email
Articles - August 2011
Wednesday, July 20, 2011
Article Index
Independent pharmacies struggle
Page 2
Page 3
Page 4
Page 5
Page 6
0811_Pharmacies_04
Paulsen’s soda fountain, which sells root beer floats for $2.75, attracts local business people as well as students from nearby Grant High School. // Photo by Eric Näslund

Like many independent pharmacists, Balo belongs to a wholesale provider group, in his case the Good Neighbor Pharmacy, a brand that gives members access to private-label purchasing, marketing materials and managed care networks. The store’s niche products and services include free home delivery, specialized “bubble packing” that allows seniors to keep track of medications in their homes, and customized drug preparations that range from cancer medications to veterinary antibiotics. Hard-to-find skin care creams, Medicare-approved “durable medical supplies,” and an old-time soda fountain featuring $2.75 root beer floats add to the offerings.

Like most independents, the bulk of Paulsen’s annual pharmacy sales, about 85%, come from prescription drugs — the national average is around 94%. Chain stores, by contrast, rely more on “front end” merchandise such as food and toiletries that can be marked up to compensate for flat rate drug reimbursement or dispensing fees.

Market diversification gives the Rite Aids of the world an edge. Nevertheless, in the David vs. Goliath tale community pharmacists like to spin about themselves, the giant is not so much the chains — or the government — as the pharmacy benefit managers. Most independents have contracts with the three biggest PBMs — Medco Health Solutions, Caremark and Express Scripts —but typically have little control over the terms. “The medicine might cost $200 and the contract pays us $202,” says Ann Murray, who, with her husband, John, owns two Murray’s Drugs, one in Condon and another in Heppner. “Most businesses have to make 20% to cover overhead,” Murray says. “You can’t expect pharmacies to survive by giving it away.”

The biggest problem with PBMs is they push consumers toward their own mail-order pharmacies, says John Murray. When the PBMs sell direct, they are able to negotiate better rates with drug manufacturers, and offer deals such as a three-month supply of medication for the cost of one. In the last few years, Murray estimates he’s lost about 20%-50% of his prescription business to mail order.

Aimed at reducing costs, mail order actually increases waste, Murray and other pharmacists contend, because patients change prescriptions before 90 days or because people take the medicine improperly. PBMs counter with their own studies saying that people are more likely to take medicines when by ordered by mail  — and that mail order saves consumers and health plan sponsors money. “Independents always argue that we’re squeezing them out of business,” says Thom Gross, a spokesperson for Express Scripts, adding that independents are actually more profitable than other drug channels, including PBMs.

The National Community Pharmacists Association is engaged in an ongoing battle with the PBMs, an effort that includes lawsuits related to deceptive practices and unfair competition. Pennsylvania and New York are also considering legislation prohibiting PBMs from mandating their customers use mail order.

 



 

Comments   

 
James
0 #1 Oregon bought into an invalid method to calculate Acquisition costJames 2011-09-23 09:53:28
Myers & Stauffer conducts a survey approach to determine pharmacist acquisition cost which is invalid by the time the information is collected, compiled and reported. It is skewed in the direction of the chain pharmacies because they report 2/3 of the data. Why not use a real-time system that costs the state almost nothing. Just go to www.pharmabayonline.com
Quote | Report to administrator
 

More Articles

Portland rises

News
Monday, August 18, 2014

IMG 2551Portland is in the middle of another construction boom, with residential and office projects springing up downtown, in the Pearl and Old Town. OB Web Editor Jessica Ridgway documents the new wave.


Read more...

Downtime

October 2014
Thursday, September 25, 2014
BY JESSICA RIDGWAY

I'm not very interesting,” says a modest Ray Di Carlo, CEO and executive producer of Bent Image Labs, an animation and visual effects studio.


Read more...

The Backstory

October 2014
Thursday, September 25, 2014

In our cover story this month, Wendy Collie, CEO of New Seasons Market, and Kim Malek, owner of Salt & Straw, discuss their rapidly growing businesses and Portland’s red hot food scene. The conversation provides an interesting lens through which to explore trends in the grocery store and restaurant sectors.


Read more...

Gone Girl

News
Monday, September 29, 2014
roundup-logo-thumb-14BY LINDA BAKER | OB EDITOR

Wehby disappears, Kitzhaber fails to disclose and Seattle gets bike share before Portland.


Read more...

Register for 100 Best Companies survey

News
Wednesday, August 20, 2014
OBM-100-best-logo-2015 150pxwBy Kim Moore | OB Editor

The 2015 survey launched this week. It is open to for-profit private and public companies that have at least 15 full- or part-time employees in Oregon.


Read more...

A Recipe for Success

October 2014
Thursday, September 25, 2014
BY LINDA BAKER

Two businesswomen, two iconic food brands and one food-obsessed city. We thought this sounded like a recipe for good conversation. So in late August, Oregon Business sat down with Wendy Collie, CEO of New Seasons Market, and Kim Malek, owner of Salt & Straw, to discuss their rapidly expanding businesses and Oregon’s trendsetting food scene.


Read more...

Private liberal arts education: superior outcomes, competitive price

Contributed Blogs
Tuesday, August 26, 2014
0826 thumb collegemoneyBY DEBRA RINGOLD | OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR

Why has six years become an acceptable investment in public undergraduate education that over-promises and underperforms?


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS