Home Back Issues August 2011 The audacious plan of Hiroshi Morihara

The audacious plan of Hiroshi Morihara

| Print |  Email
Articles - August 2011
Wednesday, July 20, 2011
Article Index
The audacious plan of Hiroshi Morihara
Page 2
Page 3
Page 4
0811_Hiroshi_02
HM3’s briquettes, made with various kinds of biomass, are intended to replace coal with no modifications required to coal-burning power plants.
// Photo by Eric Näslund

Morihara’s product looks like coal, but if it works as advertised it could end up resembling gold. The Boardman coal plant, run by Portland General Electric (PGE), is Oregon’s largest emitter of greenhouse gases, and its days of burning coal are numbered. PGE has agreed to stop burning coal there by 2020, and the utility is working closely with Morihara as he develops his torrefaction process.

Morihara decided to focus on torrefaction after recognizing PGE’s shift away from coal as a major opportunity for new suppliers. He was working on cellulosic ethanol at the time, converting plants into liquid fuel. Shifting to torrefaction, he and his team began studying what has been done with torrefaction thus far, and testing out various theories to perfect their process at a lab Morihara set up at Mount Hood Community College in Gresham.

Dozens of companies around the globe are working on torrefaction as a solution to the environmental costs of coal. Torrefaction plants have been built in Europe to lower greenhouse gas liabilities at power plants, but they have run into technical issues and are not considered reliable suppliers at this point. But that could change, and if it does, fortunes will be made. “The market is so huge, it is worldwide,” says Morihara. “A lot of winners can be born in this industry. Hopefully we will be one of them.”

Morihara’s plan is to build 20-25 plants at or near former sawmills in Oregon, producing up to 3 million tons of biomass per year. Each plant would create 22 jobs supported by another 50 or so workers responsible for collecting the biomass and bringing it to the plant, plus create various indirect jobs. Political and business leaders who are familiar with Morihara and his latest project are quick to praise him and wish him well. State Rep. Jules Bailey (D-Portland) calls Morihara’s plan an “extremely exciting” opportunity for Oregon to “set a global standard in innovation.”

In February 2010 Morihara tested HM3 briquettes at the Western Research Institute in Laramie, Wyo., the premier coal lab in the Western United States. The results showed that the HM3 product burns as coal burns, requiring no adjustments to power plant design, while releasing significantly less sulfur into the atmosphere and no detectable mercury emissions.

Morihara was thrilled with the results. But test results don’t build factories. So far HM3 has received $590,000 from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, $241,00 from the U.S. Endowment for Forestry and Communities, and $500,000 from private investors buying company shares. He will need more. He is applying for further grants and loans, and recently entered the Clean Tech Open contest for the Pacific Northwest Region. But it won’t be easy. Private lenders (at least those outside of the Internet technology sector) are investing cautiously, and public dollars are drying up as pressure builds from frugal taxpayers.

Rep. Tobias Read (D-Beaverton), a major supporter of Morihara and HM3, says any assistance from the state will need to be balanced with “the fact that we’re out of money.” For example, HM3 had qualified for assistance through the state’s Business Energy Tax Credit (BETC) program, but the state has phased out the program to cut costs. Morihara is also waiting for approval for up to $6 million under the federal EB-5 program that grants green cards to foreign investors for backing projects that create jobs, but applications have soared in that program and competition is tight.

Morihara is fully aware that raising enough money to build factories all over Oregon and winning the race to market for a promising new business (not to mention overcoming the inevitable counterattack from the coal lobby) will present a huge challenge. That’s what he likes.

 



 

Comments   

 
Ruth Duemler
0 #1 The Audacious planRuth Duemler 2011-07-29 19:46:40
Nonsense! It is not carbon neutral and the emissions are harmful to breathe! The American Lung Association and the American Heart Association along with thousands of doctors have come out against any form of biomass burning.
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
Jack Stone
0 #2 Jack Stone 2011-07-29 20:21:14
The trees are the lungs of our planet. I am sad to hear that instead of encouraging less energy use, greed will push for more energy creation.
The ALA says biomass is dangerous and unhealthy for children. Biomass is a scam and I hope the congress ends subsidies or it.
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
Tom Kruzen
0 #3 Torrified woodTom Kruzen 2011-07-30 01:42:18
Much of what is presented in this article is propaganda from and industry that is handsomely supported by sleeping American taxpayers. Burning got us into the climate change business and burning is not the solution. Efficiency like LED lights, conservation projects like smart thermostats and insulated buildings and innovation such as the "Passivhaus" have not even been tried and offer 21 st century solutions!
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
David Smith
0 #4 Biomass Energy is good for OregonDavid Smith 2011-08-09 18:04:59
Not all biomass is created equal. Its carbon neutrality is a function of its source and process inputs. All renewable energy sources, including wind and solar, have process inputs that impact their carbon foot print. Biomass derived from sustainable forestry or agriculture, and converted to usable energy through advanced combustion or gasification systems equipped with proper emission controls may be not only neutral, but carbon positive and nearly benign.
Quote | Report to administrator
 

More Articles

The Backstory

October 2014
Thursday, September 25, 2014

In our cover story this month, Wendy Collie, CEO of New Seasons Market, and Kim Malek, owner of Salt & Straw, discuss their rapidly growing businesses and Portland’s red hot food scene. The conversation provides an interesting lens through which to explore trends in the grocery store and restaurant sectors.


Read more...

Launch

September 2014
Tuesday, August 26, 2014
BY JESSICA RIDGWAY

September's Launch article features Orchid Health, BuddyUp and Inter-Europe Consulting.


Read more...

Molecular Movies

September 2014
Wednesday, August 27, 2014
BY LINDA BAKER

Dr. Chong Fang isn’t God. But the assistant professor of chemistry at Oregon State University is getting closer to figuring out how he put everything together. 


Read more...

Podcast: Testing for Emotional Intelligence with John Hersey

Contributed Blogs
Friday, September 19, 2014
ivbU3sIXBY TOM COX | OB BLOGGER

How can you tell if you, a peer, a subordinate or a job candidate has the emotional intelligence needed to do well?


Read more...

Shipping News

September 2014
Tuesday, August 26, 2014
BY JENNIFER MARGULIS

In 2012 The Dalles, a city of some 14,400 located 75 miles east of Portland and often seen as the poor cousin to adjacent Hood River, completed a massive project to revitalize its dock.


Read more...

Powerlist: Colleges and Universities

September 2014
Wednesday, August 27, 2014
BY KIM MOORE

A conversation about higher education with the presidents of the University of Oregon and Clackamas Community College, followed by September's powerlist.


Read more...

True Blood

October 2014
Thursday, September 25, 2014
BY JOE ROJAS-BURKE

Antibiotics really aren’t magic bullets.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS