The comeback trail

| Print |  Email
Articles - July 2011
Wednesday, June 22, 2011

This year's Private 150 list points to some encouraging news about the state’s economy.

The average annual revenue for this year’s group is up 7.7% over last year’s —$213.4 million. Total revenue for the 150 companies was $32.0 billion versus $29.7 billion last year. There were five companies with more than a billion in revenue this year. In 2010 there were just two.

You would think that this positive trend would have companies clamoring to tell their good news growth stories, but that’s not the case. You’ll notice there are some big companies missing from the list. It’s not because they aren’t growing. Our guess is that many of them are. But they decline to state their revenue figures, even though we list companies in a range of revenue, and don’t reveal their exact number. (Come on, the Private 150 shouldn't be that private.)

That’s a shame because if we could calculate the real total revenue growth for the state, that would give us a great barometer of where we are in digging out of our economic hole. It could not only give us hope but give us a good chart of what industries are doing well, where the job growth is and where investment might be wisest.

Here’s what we know from this year’s crop:

  • Nine out of 12 wholesale distribution companies had higher revenues this year over last year.
  • Eight out of 12 forest products companies had higher revenues this year over last year.
  • Six out of 11 professional services companies had higher revenues this year over last year.
  • Seven out of 13 retail and hospitality companies had higher revenues this year over last year.
  • Five out of 15 construction and contracting companies had higher revenues this year over last year.

But growth hasn’t been limited to the largest companies, as our cover story on Bend shows. No area flew higher during the real estate bubble, and arguably no community crashed harder than Bend. It was the canary in the coal mine. In 2007, the real estate markets in Central and Southern Oregon were the first to fall and Bend took one of the nation’s sharpest plunges in its housing market.

We set out to find out how a community recovers from economic meltdown. What we found was surprising. After spending a week in Bend recently, we came away with many examples of small, healthy endeavors that are creating jobs and helping bring the area back to life. Large or small, all of these signs of recovery are welcome news.

robin-BLOG




Robin Doussard
 

More Articles

Eco Zoned

June 2015
Friday, May 22, 2015
BY HANNAH WALLACE

Travelers have always come to Oregon for its natural beauty. But will the increasing popularity of agritourism, European-style hiking getaways and forest resorts relax Oregon's notoriously strict land-use laws?


Read more...

100 Best Green Workplaces in Oregon

June 2015
Friday, May 22, 2015
BY KIM MOORE

As momentum grows at the state level to introduce far-reaching environmental regulations, such as carbon pricing and the Clean Fuels Program, Oregon employers continue to go the extra mile to create green workplaces for their employees.


Read more...

Cherry Raincoat

June 2015
Tuesday, May 26, 2015
BY LINDA BAKER

Spring rains are the bane of an Oregon cherry farmer’s existence. Even a few sprinkles can crack the fruit so badly it’s not worth picking. Science to the rescue: Researchers at Oregon State University have developed a spray-on film that cuts rain-related cracking in half, potentially saving a season’s crop. The coating, patented as SureSeal, is made from natural chemicals similar to those found in the skins of cherries: cellulose, palm oil-based wax and calcium.


Read more...

100 Best Green Workplaces announced

News
Wednesday, May 27, 2015
OBM-100-best-Green-logo-2015-1000pxwBY LINDA BAKER | EDITOR

More than 250 people turned out today for Oregon Business magazine’s seventh annual celebration of the 100 Best Green Companies to Work For in Oregon.


Read more...

Up in the Air

June 2015
Friday, May 22, 2015
BY ANNIE ELLISON

Portland tech veteran Ben Berry is leaving his post as Portland’s chief technology officer for a full-time role producing unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) aimed at first responders and the military. Berry’s AirShip Technologies Group is poised to be on the ground floor of an industry that will supply drones to as many as 100,000 police, fire and emergency agencies nationwide. He reveals the plan for takeoff.


Read more...

Efficiency Boost

June 2015
Friday, May 22, 2015
BY JOE CORTRIGHT

How conservation stimulates the local economy.


Read more...

5 stats about Oregon fireworks

The Latest
Thursday, June 18, 2015
fireworksthumb001BY JACOB PALMER | DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

Fireworks are a booming industry, even if the pyrotechnics have turned July 4th into a day fire marshals, and many residents, love to hate.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS