The comeback trail

| Print |  Email
Articles - July 2011
Wednesday, June 22, 2011

This year's Private 150 list points to some encouraging news about the state’s economy.

The average annual revenue for this year’s group is up 7.7% over last year’s —$213.4 million. Total revenue for the 150 companies was $32.0 billion versus $29.7 billion last year. There were five companies with more than a billion in revenue this year. In 2010 there were just two.

You would think that this positive trend would have companies clamoring to tell their good news growth stories, but that’s not the case. You’ll notice there are some big companies missing from the list. It’s not because they aren’t growing. Our guess is that many of them are. But they decline to state their revenue figures, even though we list companies in a range of revenue, and don’t reveal their exact number. (Come on, the Private 150 shouldn't be that private.)

That’s a shame because if we could calculate the real total revenue growth for the state, that would give us a great barometer of where we are in digging out of our economic hole. It could not only give us hope but give us a good chart of what industries are doing well, where the job growth is and where investment might be wisest.

Here’s what we know from this year’s crop:

  • Nine out of 12 wholesale distribution companies had higher revenues this year over last year.
  • Eight out of 12 forest products companies had higher revenues this year over last year.
  • Six out of 11 professional services companies had higher revenues this year over last year.
  • Seven out of 13 retail and hospitality companies had higher revenues this year over last year.
  • Five out of 15 construction and contracting companies had higher revenues this year over last year.

But growth hasn’t been limited to the largest companies, as our cover story on Bend shows. No area flew higher during the real estate bubble, and arguably no community crashed harder than Bend. It was the canary in the coal mine. In 2007, the real estate markets in Central and Southern Oregon were the first to fall and Bend took one of the nation’s sharpest plunges in its housing market.

We set out to find out how a community recovers from economic meltdown. What we found was surprising. After spending a week in Bend recently, we came away with many examples of small, healthy endeavors that are creating jobs and helping bring the area back to life. Large or small, all of these signs of recovery are welcome news.

robin-BLOG




Robin Doussard
 

More Articles

Footloose

April 2015
Friday, March 27, 2015
BY LINDA BAKER

Founded 12 years ago, Keen Inc. likes to push the envelope, starting with the debut of the “Newport” closed toe sandal in 2003. Since then, the company has opened a factory on Swan Island and a sleek new headquarters in the Pearl District. The brand’s newest offering, UNEEK, is a sandal made from two woven cords and not much more.


Read more...

Knight Cancer Challenge No Biotech Dream

May 2015
Monday, April 27, 2015
BY JOE CORTRIGHT

The Knight challenge is an important instance of philanthropy. But we should not assume it will magically transform OHSU into a business- and job-spinning engine for the local economy.


Read more...

The Road to Reinvention

April 2015
Friday, March 27, 2015
BY AMY MILSHTEIN

Damian Smith bets on changing himself — and Portland — through consulting.


Read more...

Can small be large?

Linda Baker
Wednesday, April 01, 2015
040115-lindablogthumbBY LINDA BAKER

Leaders in Oregon's ag sector gathered this morning in Portland’s Coopers Hall winery/taproom to discuss the role of the region as an export gateway, impediments to exporting products and solutions to containerized shipping challenges.


Read more...

Oregon businesses face destruction from future earthquake

The Latest
Wednesday, May 20, 2015
htctthumb1BY KIM MOORE | RESEARCH EDITOR

An earthquake would completely destroy many Oregon businesses, highlighting the urgent need for the private and public sectors to collaborate on shoring up disaster preparedness, said panelists at an Oregon Business breakfast summit today.


Read more...

Picture This

May 2015
Monday, April 27, 2015
BY JACOB PALMER

As a general rule, the more people with autism can be provided with visual cues, the better they will be able to understand and manage their environment. It’s a lesson Tom Keating learned well. The 61-year-old Eugene grant writer spent 31 years taking care of his autistic brother James, and in the late 1980s developed a spreadsheet that created a series of nonsense characters that grew or shrank depending on how much money James had in his account. 


Read more...

5 ways successful people kickstart the day

The Latest
Thursday, April 02, 2015
coffeethumbBY JACOB PALMER | DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

Are mornings the most productive part of the day?  We ask five successful executives how they get off to a good start.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS