July 2011
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1 Magnetic nanobeads detect chemical and biological agents
2 Powerlist: Hospitals
3 Private 150: Oregon's top privately held companies
4 Bend's economy is coming back to life
5 Qatar looks to Oregon
6 State We're In: Residential real estate still falling
7 Oregon economic indicators as of April 2011
8 Perpetua's tribal deal
9 New lab addresses global contamination problem
10 ZeaChem searches for a greener coal
11 Suburban builders move to the city
12 Outside race firm draws local fire
13 Japan's thirst fuels Earth2o growth
14 Union workers picket contractor
15 ZGF Architects' next generation
16 How ready are we for disaster?
17 The comeback trail
 

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As a general rule, the more people with autism can be provided with visual cues, the better they will be able to understand and manage their environment. It’s a lesson Tom Keating learned well. The 61-year-old Eugene grant writer spent 31 years taking care of his autistic brother James, and in the late 1980s developed a spreadsheet that created a series of nonsense characters that grew or shrank depending on how much money James had in his account. 


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