Sponsored by Forest Grove Economic Development
Home Back Issues June 2011 Mount Hood's unique economy

Mount Hood's unique economy

| Print |  Email
Articles - June 2011
Wednesday, May 18, 2011
Article Index
Mount Hood's unique economy
Page 2
Page 3
Page 4
Page 5
Page 6
Page 7
Page 8
Mount Hood facts
Mount Hood tImeline

Mount Hood timeline

0611_MountainEcon_Timeline01

500,000-700,000 years ago Eruptions begin building the Mount Hood that we know today.

100,000 years ago Hood’s north side collapses, unleashing a massive avalanche that temporarily dams the Columbia River.

1781 Hood’s most recent eruption sends volcanic mudflows down the mountain and leaves in its wake the lava dome known as Crater Rock.

1792 White explorers first see the mountain and William Broughton, a British naval officer and member of George Vancouver’s exploration party, names it after Lord Samuel Hood.

1805 Lewis and Clark come across a river choked with debris from Hood’s eruption and call it the Quicksand River — today’s Sandy River.

1846 Samuel Barlow and Philip Foster build the Barlow Road from Hood’s east side over its southern pass to Oregon City.

1857 A team led by Henry Pittock, future owner of The Oregonian, nabs the first recorded summit of Mount Hood.

1892 President Benjamin Harrison protects the Bull Run Watershed in the northwest shadow of Hood. Today, it provides water to more than 800,000 Oregonians.

1889 Portland banker William Ladd and attorney C.E.S. Wood build and open Cloud Cap Inn at 6,000 feet on the north side of the mountain.

1919 Severe freeze decimates apple trees in Hood River Valley, prompting growers to switch to heartier pears.

1927 Summit Ski Area in Government Camp, the oldest ski area in the Pacific Northwest, opens its slopes.

1937 President Roosevelt dedicates the $1 million Timberline Lodge, which was built in just 15 months.

0611_MountainEcon_Timeline021966 Forest Service angers Hood River residents when it awards a permit for a new ski area to Portland builder Franklin Drake, who opens Mt Hood Meadows the next year.

1978 Stanley Kubrick shoots minor outside footage of Timberline for use in The Shining.

1986 Seven students and two faculty members of the Oregon Episcopal School are killed in the mountain’s worst climbing accident.

1988 Logging in the Mount Hood National Forest hits close to 400 million board feet and begins a steep decline. In 2010, 36 million board feet are harvested.

1991 City of Portland adds two new vista corridors downtown, which prevent new buildings from interfering with views of Mount Hood.

1999 Widespread opposition prompts Forest Service to nix proposal to limit South Side climbers to 25 per day. An estimated 10,000 climbers attempt to summit each year.

2002 An Air Force Pave Hawk helicopter evacuating an injured climber crashes and barrel-rolls 800 feet down the mountain. Everyone on board survives.

2004 Meadows scraps its controversial plan for a 450-home resort on the mountain’s north side in favor of a swap for developable land in Government Camp.

2010 Annual visits to the Mount Hood National Forest top 4.5 million.



 

More Articles

Q&A: David Lively of Organically Grown Co.

News
Tuesday, July 01, 2014
OGCLogoBY HANNAH WALLACE | OB BLOGGER

Demand for organic food continues to soar: Last year, sales of organic food rose to $32.3 billion — up 10% from 2012. In Oregon, organic produce wholesaler Organically Grown Co. has been championing organic growing methods for four decades.


Read more...

The Scott Kveton affair

News
Wednesday, July 09, 2014
ScottKvetonBY LINDA BAKER | OB EDITOR

Scott Kveton, the CEO of Urban Airship is taking a leave of absence from the company. As the story continues to unfold, here’s our perspective on a few of the key players.


Read more...

Oversight? Or gaming the system?

News
Monday, July 14, 2014
AmazonBY VIVIAN MCINERNY | OB BLOGGER

Some people think Amazon’s winking eye logo is starting to look like a hoodwink.


Read more...

Is this employee right?

Contributed Blogs
Wednesday, August 13, 2014
081314 thumb employeefeelingsBY TOM COX | OB BLOGGER

When I say, “Your Employee is Always Right,” I do not mean “right about the facts,” but rather “right about how they feel” and “right about how they want to be led.”


Read more...

Updated: Disrupting innovation

News
Tuesday, July 08, 2014
070814 thumb disputive-innovationBY LINDA BAKER  | OB EDITOR

The New Yorker recently published a sharply worded critique of “disruptive innovation,” one of the most widely cited theories in the business world today. The article raises questions about the descriptive value of disruption and innovation  — whether the terms are mere buzzwords or actually explain today's extraordinarily complex and fast changing business environment. 

Update: We caught up with Portland's Thomas Thurston, who shared his data driven take on the disruption controversy.


Read more...

Attack of the Robin Sages

Contributed Blogs
Monday, July 07, 2014
070714 thumb linkedinfakesBY TOM COX | OB BLOGGER

Named after the 2010 experiment by Thomas Ryan, "Robin Sages" are fake social media profiles designed to encourage linking and divulging valuable information.


Read more...

Risks & rewards of owning triple net investments

Contributed Blogs
Thursday, July 24, 2014
NNNinvestmentBY CLIFF HOCKLEY | OB GUEST CONTRIBUTOR

With the increasing retirements of Baby Boomers, a massive real estate shift has created a significant increase in demand for NNN properties. The result? Increased demand has triggered higher prices and lower yields.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS