Home Back Issues June 2011 Mount Hood's unique economy

Mount Hood's unique economy

| Print |  Email
Articles - June 2011
Wednesday, May 18, 2011
Article Index
Mount Hood's unique economy
Page 2
Page 3
Page 4
Page 5
Page 6
Page 7
Page 8
Mount Hood facts
Mount Hood tImeline

Mount Hood timeline

0611_MountainEcon_Timeline01

500,000-700,000 years ago Eruptions begin building the Mount Hood that we know today.

100,000 years ago Hood’s north side collapses, unleashing a massive avalanche that temporarily dams the Columbia River.

1781 Hood’s most recent eruption sends volcanic mudflows down the mountain and leaves in its wake the lava dome known as Crater Rock.

1792 White explorers first see the mountain and William Broughton, a British naval officer and member of George Vancouver’s exploration party, names it after Lord Samuel Hood.

1805 Lewis and Clark come across a river choked with debris from Hood’s eruption and call it the Quicksand River — today’s Sandy River.

1846 Samuel Barlow and Philip Foster build the Barlow Road from Hood’s east side over its southern pass to Oregon City.

1857 A team led by Henry Pittock, future owner of The Oregonian, nabs the first recorded summit of Mount Hood.

1892 President Benjamin Harrison protects the Bull Run Watershed in the northwest shadow of Hood. Today, it provides water to more than 800,000 Oregonians.

1889 Portland banker William Ladd and attorney C.E.S. Wood build and open Cloud Cap Inn at 6,000 feet on the north side of the mountain.

1919 Severe freeze decimates apple trees in Hood River Valley, prompting growers to switch to heartier pears.

1927 Summit Ski Area in Government Camp, the oldest ski area in the Pacific Northwest, opens its slopes.

1937 President Roosevelt dedicates the $1 million Timberline Lodge, which was built in just 15 months.

0611_MountainEcon_Timeline021966 Forest Service angers Hood River residents when it awards a permit for a new ski area to Portland builder Franklin Drake, who opens Mt Hood Meadows the next year.

1978 Stanley Kubrick shoots minor outside footage of Timberline for use in The Shining.

1986 Seven students and two faculty members of the Oregon Episcopal School are killed in the mountain’s worst climbing accident.

1988 Logging in the Mount Hood National Forest hits close to 400 million board feet and begins a steep decline. In 2010, 36 million board feet are harvested.

1991 City of Portland adds two new vista corridors downtown, which prevent new buildings from interfering with views of Mount Hood.

1999 Widespread opposition prompts Forest Service to nix proposal to limit South Side climbers to 25 per day. An estimated 10,000 climbers attempt to summit each year.

2002 An Air Force Pave Hawk helicopter evacuating an injured climber crashes and barrel-rolls 800 feet down the mountain. Everyone on board survives.

2004 Meadows scraps its controversial plan for a 450-home resort on the mountain’s north side in favor of a swap for developable land in Government Camp.

2010 Annual visits to the Mount Hood National Forest top 4.5 million.



 

More Articles

The Bookseller

November/December 2014
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
BY AMY MILSHTEIN

Everyone knows college is expensive, but a look at the numbers brings that into sharp — and painful — focus.


Read more...

Shifting Ground

November/December 2014
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
BY JOE ROJAS-BURKE

Bans on genetically modified crops create uncertainty for farmers.


Read more...

The Rail Baron

October 2014
Thursday, September 25, 2014
BY LINDA BAKER

Oil is gushing out of the U.S. and Canada, and much of it is coming from places that don’t have pipeline infrastructure. So it’s being shipped by rail.


Read more...

October surprise

News
Sunday, October 12, 2014
roundup-logo-thumb-14BY LINDA BAKER

Cylvia Hayes, tabloid vs. watchdog journalism and the looming threat of a Cascadia earthquake.


Read more...

Political Clout

November/December 2014
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
BY KIM MOORE

Businesses spend billions of dollars each year trying to influence political decision makers by piling money into campaigns.


Read more...

OB Poll: Wineries and groceries

News
Friday, October 24, 2014

24-winethumbA majority of respondents agreed: Local vineyards should remain Oregon-owned and quality is the most important factor when determining where to eat or buy groceries.


Read more...

The Backstory

October 2014
Thursday, September 25, 2014

In our cover story this month, Wendy Collie, CEO of New Seasons Market, and Kim Malek, owner of Salt & Straw, discuss their rapidly growing businesses and Portland’s red hot food scene. The conversation provides an interesting lens through which to explore trends in the grocery store and restaurant sectors.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS