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Mount Hood's unique economy

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Articles - June 2011
Wednesday, May 18, 2011

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  • Before awarding Richard Kohnstamm the permit to operate Timberline Lodge in 1955, the Forest Service considered burning the rundown and mismanaged lodge to the ground.
  • Hood's 11 glaciers have lost one-third to half their volume since the turn of the 20th century.
  • A storied collie from Government Camp named Ranger climbed the mountain more than 500 times in his life and was buried on the summit after he died in 1939.
  • Mount Hood is the fourth-most-dangerous volvano in the U.S. based on size and potential damage of an eruption, according to the United States Geological Survey.
  • Mount Hood is home to the oldest ski patrol-the Mount Hood Ski Patrol-and the oldest mountain search and rescue organization-the Crag Rats-in the country.
  • Since 1920, flooding and glacial outbursts have washed out or forced the closure of Highway 35 on Hood's east side no fewer than 20 times.
  • The snowcat and the releasable ski binding both trace their origins to the slopes of Mount Hood.
  • To date, every U.S. Olympic snowboarder to win a medal, including Shaun White,  has trained on Mount Hood at Windells Camp.
  • Area Native Americans of the Multnomah tribe are called Mount Hood Wy'east.


 

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