Smallest community college expands

| Print |  Email
Thursday, October 01, 2009
2009-09-10-019-cmyk
Higher education in Tillamook is getting a $12 million boost.
PHOTO COURTESY OF TILLAMOOK BAY COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Big changes are in the works for Oregon’s smallest community college. With its new $12 million campus nearly complete, Tillamook Bay Community College is expanding, modernizing and moving to gain independent accreditation.

The timing couldn’t be better. College president Jon Carnahan says enrollment is up 15% over last year. For the first time in its 28 years of existence the college will have a space of its own, designed for education. That will be a big improvement from its current home at a former mortuary where biology classes are held in what was once the embalming room.

The new campus will house Tillamook County’s economic development department, which will collaborate with the college’s small business center to support budding entrepreneurs. Other ramped-up programs include culinary arts and hospitality, firefighting and public safety, agriculture, and industrial maintenance technology. The Tillamook County Creamery cooperative is helping with the expanded ag program, while timber giants Stimpson Lumber and Hampton Affiliates are involved with the industrial maintenance program. Plans are also being made for satellite facilities north and south of the central campus, wired to enable distance learning for students unable to commute to town.

Tillamook Bay, which has just 400 full-time students and 2,000 total, operates under a contract with much larger Portland Community College, but Carnahan is taking steps toward independent accreditation, a process that usually takes about five years. “The idea is to get more local control,” he says.

Carnahan is hoping that improved facilities and the prospect of more independence will help him complete his original mission for the college. He came to Tillamook three years ago, after a 30-year career with Linn Benton Community College, to lead the search for a new president. Unable to find the right leader, he has served as interim president for longer than he had planned. He says he intends to resume his search once the move to the new campus is finished this winter. 

BEN JACKLET
 

More Articles

Dan and Louis Oyster Bar opens up to a changing neighborhood

The Latest
Thursday, December 11, 2014
121114-oystervidBy MEGHAN NOLT

VIDEO: Revamping a Classic — an iconic eatery stays relevant in a changing marketplace.


Read more...

Tackling the CEO-worker pay gap

January-Powerbook 2015
Thursday, December 11, 2014
BY OREGON BUSINESS STAFF

An SEC rule targets the disparity between executive and employee compensation, reigniting a long-standing debate about corporate social responsibility.


Read more...

Corner Office: Timothy Mitchell

January-Powerbook 2015
Saturday, December 13, 2014

A look-in on the life of Norris & Stevens' president, plus an abridged Powerlist for the best commercial real estate firms.


Read more...

The short list: Holiday habits of six Oregon CEOs

The Latest
Thursday, December 11, 2014
121214-xmaslist1BY JACOB PALMER | OB DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

We ask business and nonprofit leaders how they survive the season.


Read more...

Live, Work, Play: Amen Teter

February 2015
Tuesday, January 27, 2015
BY JACOB PALMER

Catching up with Amen Teter, Portland-based global director of action sports for Octagon Olympics & Action sports talent agency.


Read more...

Will Medford Ever Be Cool?

February 2015
Friday, January 23, 2015
BY DAN COOK | PHOTOS BY JASON E. KAPLAN

A real-estate developer and a Lithia Motors executive aim to revamp the city's forlorn downtown.


Read more...

The Human Factor

February 2015
Monday, January 26, 2015
BY BRIAN LIBBY

Matt French opens up South Waterfront.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS