Next: The micro payment

| Print |  Email
Tuesday, June 23, 2009
next People were buzzing about Portland-based Contenture’s “anti-ad network” even before the company explained what it was. Maybe it’s because the venture comes from the brains behind the popular Clicky Web Analytics tool. Or maybe it’s because online ad revenue is declining and website owners jump at any hint of an alternative. The service launched June 2 and already has 400 websites in its network. Contenture users pay $6 per month to access their favorite sites with privileges such as extra features, early access to content or blocked ads. The money is automatically dispersed among website owners according to which sites that user visits and how often. So could Contenture be the savior of newspapers by replacing ads as the dominant online revenue model? “A lot of companies have tried micro-payment models and failed,” says co-founder Noah Merritt, with no trace of anxiety. He says they’ve learned from the mistakes of others: Let users decide how much the service is worth and don’t bug them repeatedly for a credit card.
ADRIANNE JEFFRIES
 

More Articles

5 questions for Flywheel CEO Rakesh Mathur

The Latest
Wednesday, April 29, 2015
FW splashBY JACOB PALMER | DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

Portland is awash in rideshare options. We ask the head of Flywheel what sets his app apart.


Read more...

Queen of Resilience

June 2015
Friday, May 22, 2015
BY AMY MILSHTEIN

Astrid Scholz scales up sustainability.


Read more...

Fighting Fire With Fire

May 2015
Friday, April 24, 2015
BY BEN DEJARNETTE | INVESTIGATEWEST

Timber companies and environmental groups take a stab at collaboration to boost logging and restoration in Oregon fires.


Read more...

3 trends in the garden business

The Latest
Thursday, April 30, 2015
gardenthumbBY JACOB PALMER | DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

Oregonians are scrambling to get their gardens in order for the summer. Here are three tips from landscaping and urban farming expert.


Read more...

Up in the Air

June 2015
Friday, May 22, 2015
BY ANNIE ELLISON

Portland tech veteran Ben Berry is leaving his post as Portland’s chief technology officer for a full-time role producing unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) aimed at first responders and the military. Berry’s AirShip Technologies Group is poised to be on the ground floor of an industry that will supply drones to as many as 100,000 police, fire and emergency agencies nationwide. He reveals the plan for takeoff.


Read more...

Shades of Gray

May 2015
Monday, April 27, 2015
BY KIM MOORE

Are we too quick to diagnose corruption?


Read more...

6 development projects reshaping Bend

The Latest
Thursday, April 09, 2015
bendthumbBY JACOB PALMER | DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

Bend has reclaimed its prerecession title as one of the fastest growing cities in the country.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS